Where to Metal Detect in New Brunswick

7 Best Places to Metal Detect in New Brunswick [Maps, Laws and More]

I remember heading over to Saint John in New Brunswick for the summer. My family and I were excited about the hopeful treasures that awaited us that summer. Needless to say, we found a couple of Canadian coins, and it’s been a long-lasting memory for me.

So, you want to go prospecting in New Brunswick, and you probably don’t know where to start. Let me take you under my wing and show you the best spots, resources you’ll need, and the laws in the area. I’ve added a couple of links to help you further and probably give you one of the best summers for you and your family.

7 Best Places to Metal Detect in New Brunswick

New Brunswick has been the home of several historical events, and some of these locations are prime for prospecting. Not only that, but no law stops detectorists from prospecting in provincial parks. So, if you do your research right, you can come across some pretty epic locations and finds.

Regardless, the seven best places to go metal detecting in New Brunswick are here.

1.  Parlee Beach – Great for Beach Hunting (Parlee Beach, New Brunswick)

As a 2.24 km stretch, Parlee beach is one of the most popular beaches in New Brunswick. Located southeast of New Brunswick, the beach is close to a commercial area so that you can access restaurants and cafes.

Where to Metal Detect in Place Parlee Beach

Parlee Beach for Metal Detecting
Parlee Beach for Metal Detecting – Image Credit Google Maps

New Brunswick, in general, had numerous naval wars throughout time. Some of these wars ended in victory, while others did not. Not only that, but there were several constructions of forts during this time. So, there’s a high probability that the seas may wash up a treasure or two.

But you’ll have to be careful, Parlee Beach is a provincial park, and it has specific laws when you can go prospecting.

2.   Saint John – The Largest City in New Brunswick (Saint John City, New Brunswick, Largest City in New Brunswick)

Saint John is the largest and oldest city in New Brunswick. Located south of the province, the city was home to thousands of Irish migrators. It’s one of the reasons why New Brunswick is known as the home of the Irish.

Where To Metal Detect in Saint John

Metal Detecting Saint John NB
Metal Detecting Saint John NB – Image Credit Google Maps

Saint John is a massive city, and there’s a massive likelihood that you’ll come across Irish coins alongside Canadian coins. Some prospectors found medals alongside these coins. So, where do you go prospecting? I’d recommend trying out the following locations:

1.  Jellystone Park – Close to the St. John River (Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park™ Woodstock, New Brunswick)

Jellystone Park is a camping ground full of fun activities for families. The location is also in a forested area, right in the outdoors. You will have your work cut out for you. But what makes it an excellent place for prospecting?

Where to Metal Detect at Jellystone Park

Jellystone Park by Woodstock NB
Jellystone Park by Woodstock NB – Image Credit Google Maps

Well, it’s all thanks to the St. John River. French colonialists settled along the St. John River, making it ideal for metal detecting. Not only that, but the park is next to a forested area, giving detectorists options for their prospecting. You can choose to prospect along the river or in the rich forests next to the park.

2.  Sullivan Park – A Provincial Park (Sullivan Park, Sussex, New Brunswick)

Sullivan Park sits at the heart of Sussex, a town in Canada. From what I learned; Sullivan Park is a popular spot for local metal detectorists. Many detectorists would go prospecting after their jobs due to its convenient location.

Where to Metal Detect in Sullivan Park

Sullivan Park hosts other recreational activities other than metal detecting for the locals. You have a nature trail, an outdoor rink, a basketball court, and other amenities. The entire park is at your disposal during its opening hours. The real question would be where not to detect in Sullivan Park because you have the entire park to prospect.

3.  Miramichi Golf & Country Club – A Diamond in the Rough (Miramichi, New Brunswick)

Miramichi Golf & Country Club is a complicated location. Its located close to the center of Miramichi, one of the largest cities in New Brunswick. So why is it interesting? Well, you might need a permit to prospect on this land. You might need to be a member to go metal detecting, if I’m right. The rules tend to change in locations like these. It would be in your best interest to call in advance.

4.  Odell Park – A Provincial Park (Odell Park, Fredericton, New Brunswick)

Originally, Odell Park was the home of Rev. Jonathan Odell, and in 1954, it became a park. It offers numerous activities throughout the year and is a top spot for local detectorists. Furthermore, the park sits at the heart of Fredericton, the capital city of New Brunswick.

5.  Morell Park – A Park Bordering St. John River (Morell Park, Fredericton, New Brunswick)

Last and certainly not the least is Morell Park, also located at the heart of Fredericton. According to historians, French colonialists lived along the St. John River and mainly populated the lower valley known as Acadia. Morell Park sits along that area. Not only that, but the French lived along the river banks before they moved to higher ground. So, with that in mind, I highly recommend Morell Park.

Metal Detecting Tip:  Do research if you’re looking for relics. The internet, library records, heck, even just stories from the locals, make excellent prospects for a prosperous prospect. Get these tips from https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/.

Metal Detecting Laws for New Brunswick

According to Parks Canada policies, there are no laws that prevent detectorists from prospecting in provincial parks. However, there are laws that detectorists need to consider before prospecting in parks.

According to Section 7 of the National Parks General Regulations, metal detecting is not on the list of restricted and prohibited activities in provincial parks.

So, what are the laws that detectorists need to consider?

  1. Section 10 of the National Parks General Regulations prohibits people from removing, defacing, damaging, or destroying any flora or natural objects in a park except under a permit issued under subsection 11(1) or 12(1).
  2. Section 12 (1) and 12 (2) of the National Parks General Regulations prohibit people from digging holes in a national park. 
  3. Section 14 (1) of the National Parks General Regulations states that removing or compromising prehistoric or historical artifacts or structures in a national park is illegal.

Metal Detecting Tip: To help a detectorist navigate to the actual National Parks General Regulations here’s a short cut link > NP Regulations

There is another law that all detectorists need to remember, especially in New Brunswick. Under section 7 (1) of the National Parks General Regulations, as of June 2021, metal detecting in Fundy National Park of Canada is restricted.

The Canadian law prohibits the exclusive use of metal detectors in Fundy National Park. The only way you can metal detect in Fundy National Park is if you have a special permit only given to researchers. 

Metal Detecting Clubs in New Brunswick

  • Metal Detecting New Brunswick – an active public group on Facebook – check them out here.
  • r/metaldetecting – an active subreddit where you can meet detectorists from all over the world – check them out here.
  • Metal Detecting Canada – A Facebook group, dedicated to metal detecting throughout Canada. – check them out here.

Metal Detecting Treasures Found in New Brunswick.

New Brunswick is rich in cultural materials dating from the 1800s. Detectorists have found numerous treasures from Acadian tools, Irish coins, and Canadian coins. So, what are some of these rare treasures?

  1. In 2019, a group of detectorists found a rare Acadian dyke spade in a field in Mount Whatley. The location was miles away from the historical fort of Fort Beauséjour.
  1.  The Musée acadien at l’Université de Moncton showcases another rare artifact. Another Acadian spade was found in Dieppe and dates to 1880.

Metal Detecting Resources in New Brunswick.

Research is your part and parcel of metal detecting. There’s no way around it if you want to find epic treasure. Your primary resources will be libraries (for historical knowledge) and connecting with local metal detectorists.

  • Metal Detecting New Brunswick – an active public group on Facebook – check them out here.
  • New Brunswick Public Libraries – holds historical information that you can use to increase your chances of success. – check the Saint John one here.

Metal Detecting Tip:   Start in your yard to get comfortable. Practice is the best form of experience, and where best to start than in the privacy of your backyard. Get these tips from https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/.

Metal Detector Stores in New Brunswick for Expert Advice

Few retailers supply metal detectors in New Brunswick. But don’t let that stop you if you don’t find the model you want for your collection. You can always order and ship your desired metal detector from the United States of America.

  • Canadian Tire – https://www.canadiantire.ca/en.html
  • BAP Equipment LTD – https://www.bapequipmentstore.com/ (A Garrett Dealer in New Brunswick)

I’m frequently asked what machine I use and recommend. No doubt about it, for the beginner get the Nokta Makro Simplex + Kit it’s the best. 100% waterproof, wireless headphones and pinpointer. Check prices and reviews with quick links below.

The next thing you need is a great shovel, believe me when I say you’ll dig more knowing you can dig FASTER. Links below to the nearly bullet proof Lesche T- Handle Shovel

Metal Detecting and Beaches are a perfect match. Sunshine easy digging and lots of people means dropped coins and jewelry. To search a beach affectively you’ve GOT TO HAVE A SAND SCOOP. CKG Sand Scoops are heavy duty and able to use as a shovel.

If it’s time up UP YOUR GAME and get the industry standard metal detector. The Minelab Equinox 800 IS THE BEST. Okay it’s not cheap, but your finds are going to increase with this machine. Shortcut links for reviews and current prices.



David-Humphries-Metal-Detecting

David Humphries, Writer and Creator of METAL DETECTING TIPS. After borrowing my son’s detector and finding $.25. I felt like a treasure hunter. FREE MONEY! I was seriously bitten by the metal detecting bug.

Read about David -> HERE

Want to send me a question – contact

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