7 Best Places to Metal Detect in Washington State [Maps, Laws and More]

7 Best Places to Metal Detect in Washington State [Maps, Laws and More]

The beautiful west coast. It’ss a place of fresh air, new beginnings, rugged mountains, and some of the best metal detecting in North America. Why do I say this? Because when I took my family to Washington state to see Mount Rainier – an active volcano in the mountains, I was surprised at how organized their metal detecting culture was.

The state of Washington makes life easy for metal detectorists. Sure, we still have to fill out a form, but unlike some states, Washington has an accessible online portal that makes it simple to register. You can register your detecting for many state parks, which gives you a wide variety compared to other stricter states.

With the ease of registration and so many state parks allowing metal detecting in designated areas, it can still be challenging to determine where to go. So, I’ve lined up my favorite seven state parks in Washington state where you can have a great time metal detecting and even bring the family. Let’s dive in.

1.     Beacon Rock State Park – Amazing Adventures And Lots To Do And See

Our journey begins in the heart of the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area of Washington. One thing that is impressive about this park is that Beacon Rock, towering above the local foliage, is the heart of an ancient volcano!

The park boasts over 9,500 feet of freshwater shoreline and holds over 4,400 acres of year-round park beauty. There are many things to do and enjoy at Beacon Rock, and one of the main reasons I like the park is the diversity of areas that you are allowed to detect. Look at the resource section further in this article and check out the state parks’ maps that show the areas where metal detecting is permitted (the map shows 13 large allowable areas where we can detect our heart’s content).

Some of the great things you can do at this park are:

  • Camping
  • Boating
  • Biking
  • Hiking
  • Equestrian Trails
  • Fishing
  • Rock Climbing

Here’s how to find the Beacon Rock State Park – https://goo.gl/maps/Exqu4XhzmJaERooe6

Map of metal detecting permissible areas – https://parks.state.wa.us/DocumentCenter/View/8437/Beacon-Rock-State-Park-Metal-Detecting-PDF

Source: https://parks.state.wa.us/474/Beacon-Rock


2.     Kanaskat-Palmer State Park – White Water Rafting And Detecting Adventures

Two miles of shoreline on the Green River and the Kanaskat-Palmer State Park might appear to be like any other state park where a river traverses its boundary. But, this park has a lot more to offer than meets the eye. Some of the best kayaking can be found at the K.P., as I like to call it. Although with no actual boat launch to speak of, the park does offer some of the most exciting whitewater rafting around if you don’t mind launching by hand. That being said, kayaks are an excellent option for a side-adventure when you tire of detecting the 19-acre permissible detection area and trails.

Here are some of the park’s highlights:

  • White Water Rafting
  • Kayaking
  • Camping

You can find this incredible park here – https://goo.gl/maps/9Pv99c3qRQZf7wybA

Map of metal detecting permissible areas – https://parks.state.wa.us/DocumentCenter/View/8162/Kanaskat-Palmer-State-Park-Metal-Detecting-PDF

Source: https://parks.state.wa.us/527/Kanaskat-Palmer


3.     Lake Sylvia State Park – Gorgeous And Quant

First arriving at Lake Sylvia State Park, I was taken aback by the beauty of this gem of a park nestled in the forest just north of the town of Montesano, Washington. The park boasts only 6 acres of permissible metal detection areas, but the beauty makes it completely worth it.

Metal Detecting at Lake Sylvia State Park WA
Metal Detecting at Lake Sylvia State Park WA

The small lake only allows non-motorized watercraft, so there’s no danger of loud and obnoxious boat engines buzzing around, polluting the pristine waters of Lake Sylvia. The area offers a variety of nature-based activities as well, from bird watching to fishing.

Here are a few of the park’s amenities and activities:

  • Hiking
  • Mountain biking
  • Camping
  • Fishing
  • Boating (non-motorized)

You can find Lake Sylvia State Park here – https://goo.gl/maps/VxfPHq1fYksJQoWcA

Map of metal detecting permissible areas – https://parks.state.wa.us/DocumentCenter/View/9786/Lake-Sylvia-State-Park-Metal-Detecting-PDF

Source: https://parks.state.wa.us/534/Lake-Sylvia


4.     Rockport State Park – Green Forest West Coast Beauty

Do you like the forest? If you do, then Rockport State Park is a dream come true! There are some of the most beautiful hiking trails with ferns that you’re only going to see growing the way the west coast offers. Boasting over 14 acres of permissible metal detecting trails, this is one of those extreme inner peace kinds of parks. You can lose yourself in the beauty of the trails, stop for a picnic and admire the trees, some of which are over 250 feet tall!

Here are some of the park’s activities:

  • Hiking (day use only)
  • Bird watching

You can find the Rockport State Park here – https://goo.gl/maps/UDg2LLvAwYsa4eAs8

Map of metal detecting permissible areas – https://parks.state.wa.us/DocumentCenter/View/8348/Rockport–State-Park-Metal-Detecting-PDF

Source: https://parks.state.wa.us/574/Rockport


This website is all about the how, where and gear used in metal detecting. Below are some great articles to teach a bit more about “treasure hunting” with a metal detector.


5.     Ocean City State Park – Clamming And Detecting In One Place

The first time we traveled to Ocean City State Park, I was surprised to find out we could do a little clamming. It’s a great spot to dig up razor clams for a great tasty treat in season. I mean, who doesn’t like doing a little clamming in between detection tours, right? With the four large detection zones in the park, you’re likely to get hungry, after all.

This park boasts camping, fishing, bird watching, hiking, and even has a picnic area. You can stop with a decent-sized group for a big outing together if you like. It has over 145 camping sites and also 29 RV hookup sites, so everyone is bound to find a way to spend the night and enjoy their time in Ocean City State Park.

Map of metal detecting permissible areas – https://parks.state.wa.us/DocumentCenter/View/9796/Ocean-City-State-Park-Metal-Detecting-PDF

Source: https://parks.state.wa.us/554/Ocean-City


Metal Detecting Tip: Have you ever had a stretch where you didn’t get so much as a beep and realized your tuning was off? I once spent half a day hunting before realizing the long stretch of silence was a mistuned detector. So, how do we prevent this pickle? By carrying a test coin, that’s how. Or, as some on the forums like to call it – a tuning coin. Bring one in your gear so you can test and tune your detector on the fly to ensure top results. For more great tips on detecting and more, read this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/


6.     Kitsap Memorial State Park – Beauty And Romance In A Park

Were you looking to spark a little romance in your life? Well, I can tell you we enjoyed the peaceful rental cabins nestled in this beautiful park. There are many great activities to do here as well, with over 1,700 feet of saltwater shoreline and over 20 acres of metal detection permissible area. Again allowing for things like fishing, crabbing, clamming, oystering, hiking, swimming, and more, you really can’t go wrong with Kitsap Memorial State Park.

Map of metal detecting permissible areas – https://parks.state.wa.us/DocumentCenter/View/9784/Kitsap-Memorial-State-Park-Metal-Detecting-PDF

Source: https://parks.state.wa.us/529/Kitsap-Memorial


Warning: If your metal detector isn’t completely waterproof you might not want to scan beaches. When a metal detector manufacturers WATERPROOFS a unit it has been designed to keep SAND, SALT WATER and MOISTURE out. Don’t ruin your machine get a waterproof unit – I highly recommend the: Garrett AT MAX link to Kellyco

Garrett AT MAX photo credit Kellyco

The last stop on our adventures brings us right to the coast at Westport Light State Park. The park boasts an area of over 50 acres for metal detecting along the gorgeous shoreline. The metal detection zone even stretches right out of the park and into the Seashore Conservation Area, so as long as you’re permits allow, you could detect until your heart is content.

Map of metal detecting permissible areas – https://parks.state.wa.us/DocumentCenter/View/8352/Westport-Light-State-Park-Metal-Detecting-PDF

Source: https://www.parks.state.wa.us/284/Westport-Light


Metal Detecting Laws For Washington State

Washington State is one of those states that fall into the mid-zone for laws regarding metal detecting. For example, most cities don’t allow metal detecting in their parks, except for cities like Seattle that do allow it. However, Seattle law states that the shovel must be handheld with a blade no wider than 2”. So, if you’re staying in Seattle, have at the parks with your detector and small hand spade!

Like other states, National Forests and BLM land is illegal to detect metal without a special prospecting permit, so it may not be worth the effort, but that’s up to you.

Washington State Parks is a progressive state park service that allows metal detecting in multiple parks. You have to register first, but that’s easy via their online portal. Just make sure you check in with staff at the park after registering and find out which areas of the park you are allowed to detect metal.

Quick Law Recap:

  • State Parks: Permit required, allowed in multiple parks in designated areas.
  • National Forests: Permit required from US Forest Service
  • BLM Lands: Permit required. – Go over to the BLM website to learn more about using a metal detector on BLM land. Link – Bureau of Land Management

Metal Detecting Clubs In Washington State


Metal Detecting Tip: Have you ever tried hard not to disturb things with a big hole, but a tree root is right in your path? Try using a hand shovel that has a built-in serrated blade along one side. These handy tools work great at cutting through pesky tree roots blocking your path to a potential great find. For more great tips, take a look at this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/


Metal Detecting Treasures Found In Washington State

In June of 2020, a man and some friends were metal detecting on a beach in Washington when a man found something he’d never seen before. Buried just six inches in the sand was a brass button with a phoenix on it and some French writing. It turns out it was a brass military button from the 1800s. An English company made the button for the king of Haiti and his military. It just goes to show that you never know what you are going to find. Read the full story here – https://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2020/06/25/Man-finds-Haitian-Phoenix-Button-from-1800s-on-Washington-state-beach/7521593114417/


Metal Detecting Resources In Washington State


Metal Detector Stores In Washington State For Expert Advice


I’m always getting asked what equipment I use. I’ve been recommending the same solid metal detecting equipment for years.

  • My first metal detector was the Garrett Ace 250 (link to Amazon for current prices and reviews). This machine is still working great after 6 years. I keep it around for “group” treasure hunts.
  • I’m currently sweeping with a Garrett AT Pro Metal Detector (Link to Amazon for Prices). Since I bought my AT PRO Garrett has come out with a package that includes wireless headphones. Getting tangled up in a wire when your on your knees digging is a pain. Check out the Garrett AT MAX package with Z-Lynk Headphones and Pin Pointer (Link for great prices over at Amazon)
  • When it comes to digging two tools are a must have. 1. A hand trowel -I recommend the Lesche Digging and Cutting Tool (link to check it out) and 2. A sand scoop – the one I’m using is the CKG Sand Scoop with Handle (Link to Amazon for current price and reviews) A good sand scoop is a game changer for beaches.
  • Finally get a good pinpointer. I have an older Garrett Pro, but the newer version – Garrett Pro-Pointer AT with Z-Lynk is completely waterproof to 20 feet and hooks up to your wireless headphones.

David Humphries, Writer and Creator of METAL DETECTING TIPS. After borrowing my son’s detector and finding $.25. I felt like a treasure hunter. FREE MONEY! I was seriously bitten by the metal detecting bug.


7 Best Places to Metal Detect in Wyoming [Maps, Laws and More]

7 Best Places to Metal Detect in Wyoming [Maps, Laws and More]

There are two things I love about Wyoming – The mountains and the feel of the wild west. Those are the two reasons I wanted to take my family there. With towns like Jackson Wyoming, with their wild west wooden building flair, who wouldn’t want to go for a visit? Oh, and we can’t forget Yellowstone either.

We bundled our things into the camper and set off for wild west adventure. I had my handy metal detector all tuned and ready to go, but I recall that Wyoming’s rules aren’t as friendly as some other states. I suppose that’s the rough nature of the wild west. So I decided to make a few calls to some of my favorite state parks we would visit along the way and see if I could arrange to get my permissions to detect.

Treasure Hunting with a Metal Detector in Wyoming
Treasure Hunting with a Metal Detector in Wyoming

When the family and I made the trek to Wyoming, we chose seven of their state parks to visit and sometimes even spend the night. These parks all require permission to metal detect, but I’ll get more into the laws later. Let’s dive into my favorite seven state parks in Wyoming to do some metal detecting.

1.     Glendo State Park – Wyoming’s Best Kept Secret

Glendo State Park, with its more than 22,000-acre size, is one of Wyoming’s best-kept secrets. It’s got everything from fishing and boating to camping and hiking. It’s Wyoming’s all-around best state park, in my opinion, and a great place to take the family.

As I mentioned, this park has it all. Here are just a few of the things you can do at this park:

  • Swimming
  • Hiking
  • Biking
  • Boating
  • Camping

And here are a few of the amenities you’ll find there:

  • Six boating ramps
  • 45 miles of multi-use trails (non-motorized)
  • Swimming beach
  • Campsites for tenting & RVs
  • Restrooms, playgrounds, and more!

Here’s how to find the Glendo State Park – https://goo.gl/maps/NJ9Cvrz4PkPatsaB7

Source: https://wyoparks.wyo.gov/index.php/places-to-go/glendo


I’m always getting asked what equipment I use. I’ve been recommending the same solid metal detecting equipment for years.

  • My first metal detector was the Garrett Ace 250 (link to Amazon for current prices and reviews). This machine is still working great after 6 years. I keep it around for “group” treasure hunts.
  • I’m currently sweeping with a Garrett AT Pro Metal Detector (Link to Amazon for Prices). Since I bought my AT PRO Garrett has come out with a package that includes wireless headphones. Getting tangled up in a wire when your on your knees digging is a pain. Check out the Garrett AT MAX package with Z-Lynk Headphones and Pin Pointer (Link for great prices over at Amazon)
  • When it comes to digging two tools are a must have. 1. A hand trowel -I recommend the Lesche Digging and Cutting Tool (link to check it out) and 2. A sand scoop – the one I’m using is the CKG Sand Scoop with Handle (Link to Amazon for current price and reviews) A good sand scoop is a game changer for beaches.
  • Finally get a good pinpointer. I have an older Garrett Pro, but the newer version – Garrett Pro-Pointer AT with Z-Lynk is completely waterproof to 20 feet and hooks up to your wireless headphones.

2.     Buffalo Bill State Park – Camping, Fishing, And Fun

The Buffalo Bill State Park was named after the man himself, Colonel “Buffalo” William Cody. A part of the park’s land was even once owned by Bill, making it a living piece of the wild west, preserved in the state park.

There are lots to do at Buffalo Bill State Park, including fishing, camping, hiking, boating, and more. Let’s take a look and see some of the park’s highlights:

  • Camping sites for tents & RVs
  • Boat ramp
  • ORVs (Off-Road Vehicles) allowed
  • Fishing
  • Playground
  • Volleyball court

You can find this wild west park here – https://goo.gl/maps/TUJSR2xWGfwJJzcNA

Source: https://wyoparks.wyo.gov/index.php/places-to-go/buffalo-bill


3.     Sinks Canyon State Park – Mystery Disappearing Creeks and Adventure

If you like a little more adventure than your average campsite, Sinks Canyon State Park is an excellent getaway in Wyoming. The park is geared towards the adventurous side of things, so getting permission to metal detect isn’t typically a big deal. That’s only the formalities, though, because, at Sinks Canyon, adventure awaits!

Here are a few of the park’s activities and amenities:

  • Cabins
  • Camping sites for tents & RVs
  • Rock Climbing
  • Mountain Biking

You can find Sinks Canyon State Park here – https://goo.gl/maps/UCWs2SxJLAL4sDRs9

Source: https://wyoparks.wyo.gov/index.php/places-to-go/sinks-canyon


Metal Detecting on BLM
Metal Detecting on BLM

4.     Seminoe State Park

Seminoe State Park offers some tremendous all-around park experiences. With its large reservoir and sand dunes, the park has some spectacular opportunities to do some metal detecting along the beach. When you’re done for the day, you can pack it in at the campground with spots for tent or RV camping.

Here are some of the park’s activities:

  • Beach & swimming
  • Hiking
  • Biking
  • Off-road vehicles (ORV) allowed
  • Camping sites for tents & RVs
  • Boat ramps
  • Fishing pier

You can find Seminoe State Park here – https://goo.gl/maps/LWUYBCqP9zhCnsGM6

Source: https://wyoparks.wyo.gov/index.php/places-to-go/seminoe


5.     Boysen State Park – An Oasis in The Desert

If you’re a fan of fishing or any kind of watersport, then Boysen State Park is the park for you. Sporting a vast reservoir, you can come here and use the ramp to launch your boat to do some waterskiing, or go fishing, or even just float about the water for the day. If you’re like me, then you’ll be prospecting around the park while the family plays in the water.

The park has a playground, volleyball courts, camping for tents or RVs, a beach, and a few other amenities like hiking to please you and your family.

Source: https://wyoparks.wyo.gov/index.php/places-to-go/boysen


Metal Detecting Tip: Carry a sifter with you for the beach. You can even use a strainer. The concept is to have something that can quickly and effectively sift sand so you can scoop the sand into the sifter and quickly find lost rings and coins. Sifters aren’t expensive, and they can save you a bunch of time. For more great tips on detecting and more, read this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/


6.     Hot Springs State Park – Hot Springs and Bison

There is something very peaceful about a majestic herd of bison grazing in the distance. It offers a sense of true wilderness like there was somewhere left in the world, untainted by humankind. If peace and relaxation are your things, then the Hot Springs State Park is a must-visit destination in Wyoming.

Some of the amenities you might expect at Hot Springs State Park are hot springs. They do have a unique all-natural mineral water pool where you can soak your troubles away. With 8 miles and counting of prime hiking around the Earth’s natural heated water wonders, a sense of peace and awe at nature is practically guaranteed.

The family will love the park having things like fishing, hiking, swimming, a playground, and even hotels to stay at for the night. Still, there. Keep in mind the park is a day-use park, so you’ll need to either stay at a hotel or find somewhere else to bed for the night. But with hot springs and beautiful scenery, how could anyone not want to stop by for the day?

Source: https://wyoparks.wyo.gov/index.php/places-to-go/hot-springs



If you’d like more articles about metal detecting check out the links below.

7.     Keyhole State Park

The last of the state park greats of Wyoming is one of the best – Keyhole State Park. This park offers some fantastic features that your family is going to love. With a beach that’s well-used to camping areas, there are plenty of places you could find treasures with your detector. And the staff here are amicable, so getting permission to detect shouldn’t be too much of a hassle.

The Keyhole State Park has many amenities. These include a beach, camping sites for tenting or RVing, a boat ramp, showers, and even an equestrian facility. Worth stopping at this park for a night or three with so much to do here!

Source: https://wyoparks.wyo.gov/index.php/places-to-go/keyhole


Metal Detecting Laws for Wyoming

Wyoming has a rich history and a beauty that is hard to match. And the laws for metal detecting are as strict as the land is wild. Well, that might be a stretch, but it sounded good at the time. Wyoming has three basics you need to be aware of to keep your metal detecting on the legal side of things.

  1. Archeological or historic sites are not allowed.
  2. National forests and BLM land require special permits (not always easy to get).
  3. State parks and recreational areas require the written permission of the park superintendent.

As you may have gleaned from the above three things, we need to know about Wyoming metal detecting law, the state parks are the most accessible place to go metal detecting legally. The park superintendents usually have a simple form you complete, and they give you written permission. Most don’t charge for it, but times change, so anticipate a minimal administration fee.

Quick Law Recap:

Wyoming State Parks: Written permission from the superintendent is required.

Archaeological or Historic Sites: Metal detecting is not permitted.

National Forests: Permit required from US Forest Service.

BLM Lands: Permit required.


Metal Detecting Clubs In Wyoming

As far as I could tell, it seems there is a need for a metal detecting club in Wyoming. There appear to be various forum threads about where Wyoming metal detectorists seek partners in adventure. Still, there doesn’t appear to be an organization in the state boasting the title of a metal detector club of sorts. There are, however, a few gold prospecting clubs, similar and may still be of interest to you:

Metal Detecting Tip: Have you ever used a pinpointer? Do yourself a favor and pick one up. They are smaller, hand-held units that work great to help you pinpoint a location during your dig. I grabbed one a few years back, and I love it. I just carry it in my pack, and when I’m digging, I can use it in one hand with my shovel in the other. That lessens my impact on the area and keeps the park rangers happy. Minimal impact is the way to go. For more great tips, take a look at this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/


Metal Detecting Treasures Found In Wyoming

Although there aren’t any recent massive treasure stories found in Wyoming, it’s a great place to look. Yes, you’ll need to go through a bit of effort in securing your permissions but think of it this way – that effort may just pay off in gold! Many a prospector has searched for gold in the creeks and streams of Wyoming. It’s one of those states that the glaciers once left a lot of deposits behind.

Although it may be unlikely you’re going to find a sizeable gold cache, you might just find a small vein of dust or even a tiny nugget if you’re in the right place. And having your metal detector will make finding that sort of thing a lot easier.


Metal Detecting Resources In Wyoming


Metal Detector Stores In Wyoming For Expert Advice

David Humphries, Writer and Creator of METAL DETECTING TIPS. After borrowing my son’s detector and finding $.25. I felt like a treasure hunter. FREE MONEY! I was seriously bitten by the metal detecting bug.


7 Best Places to Metal Detect in New York [Maps, Laws and More]

7 Best Places to Metal Detect in New York [Maps, Laws and More]

We were traveling through the northern states and had just finished our Pennsylvania tour when we thought it wouldn’t be right to head home when the statue of liberty was so near. My wife and I decided the kids had to see this national landmark. And while in the state, why not do a tour of some of the best parks for metal detecting? I mean, we were in the state now anyway, right?

New York State is one of the more fascinating states in the US. With over 800 languages spoken in the state (most in New York City) and sites such as the Big Apple and Statue of Liberty, it makes sense why the state and city are famous worldwide.

Metal Detecting in New York
Metal Detecting in New York

But the state has so much more to offer than just the Big Apple and Lady Liberty. New York has some of the most incredible state parks that you can’t pass up if you’re in the state. And despite needing a permit, there is some great opportunity to do some detecting as well.

Let’s take a journey through 7 of the state parks, and subsequently, 7 of my favorite places to get my metal detector running.

1.     Beaver Island State Park – Fun Close to The Border

Starting our New York journey at the top, we traveled to the Canadian border (almost) to visit Beaver Island State Park. While you’re there, a few minutes and you’re in Niagara Falls, where you can see some of the most spectacular freshwater falls in the world.

Your family will love the vast number of things to do at Beaver Island State Park. It’s a good thing, too, because you’ll likely want to be metal detecting, right? Take a look at some of the great things you can do at this park:

  • Swimming beach (great to use your detector here)
  • Boating
  • Fishing
  • Biking
  • Nature Center

Here’s how to find the Beaver Island State Park – https://goo.gl/maps/2s85yo6hkxfV3LGs5

Source: https://parks.ny.gov/parks/beaverisland/details.aspx


I’m always getting asked what equipment I use. I’ve been recommending the same solid metal detecting equipment for years.

  • My first metal detector was the Garrett Ace 250 (link to Amazon for current prices and reviews). This machine is still working great after 6 years. I keep it around for “group” treasure hunts.
  • I’m currently sweeping with a Garrett AT Pro Metal Detector (Link to Amazon for Prices). Since I bought my AT PRO Garrett has come out with a package that includes wireless headphones. Getting tangled up in a wire when your on your knees digging is a pain. Check out the Garrett AT MAX package with Z-Lynk Headphones and Pin Pointer (Link for great prices over at Amazon)
  • When it comes to digging two tools are a must have. 1. A hand trowel -I recommend the Lesche Digging and Cutting Tool (link to check it out) and 2. A sand scoop – the one I’m using is the CKG Sand Scoop with Handle (Link to Amazon for current price and reviews) A good sand scoop is a game changer for beaches.
  • Finally get a good pinpointer. I have an older Garrett Pro, but the newer version – Garrett Pro-Pointer AT with Z-Lynk is completely waterproof to 20 feet and hooks up to your wireless headphones.

2.     Cayuga Lake State Park – Beautiful Fresh Water Views

On the shores of Cayuga Lake is the Cayuga Lake State Park. This park is a beautiful adventure in the north-central region of New York State. With some fantastic fishing, camping, and more, there are all kinds of fun things to do at Cayuga Lake. That includes metal detecting.

When you are out with your detector, there are a number of activities your family can enjoy if they don’t see the thrill in detecting as you do. Here are some of those activities:

  • Swimming beach (great place to detect treasures)
  • Boat launches
  • Fishing
  • Camping
  • Playgrounds

You can find this incredible park here – https://goo.gl/maps/QKWXNFWpdfJZHDNg7

Source: https://parks.ny.gov/parks/cayugalake/details.aspx


3.     Cedar Point State Park – One of New York’s Oldest State Parks

A beautiful park along the Thousand Island region of New York, the sandy beach leaves many a treasure behind. There’s also fishing and being on the St. Lawrence River’s shores, and there is also good boating (rentals are on-site) to keep the family entertained.

Here are some of the park’s amenities:

  • Playgrounds
  • Boat rentals
  • Boat launches
  • Camping
  • Cabins
  • Dockage
  • Fishing
  • Swimming beach

You can get to Cedar Point State Park here – https://goo.gl/maps/Abz9HpPetYggwSZ77

Source: https://parks.ny.gov/parks/cedarpoint/details.aspx


4.     Grafton Lakes State Park – Fun in Saratoga

Including six ponds that are more like small lakes, Grafton Lakes State Park includes over 2,500 acres of land. With beautiful trails, beaches, and more, it’s a great place to use a detector to find some lost treasures.

There are both summer and winter accessible areas in Grafton Lakes State Park, and you can even rent boats here in the summer. There are also lots of other things to do such as:

  • Ice Fishing
  • Equestrian trails
  • Biking
  • Hiking
  • Hunting
  • Fishing
  • Boat Rentals
  • Swimming beach

You can find the Grafton Lakes State Park here – https://goo.gl/maps/PdgdqBLekvcqABp39

Source: https://parks.ny.gov/parks/graftonlakes/details.aspx


5.     Taconic State Park – Mountains and Massachusetts

Taconic State Park is right by the border to Massachusetts. This beautiful state park offers various amenities, from camping to hiking to boating on the 64-acre pond. If you have your canoe or kayak, or even a small boat, you’re welcome to launch and spend some time on the water, as long as you’re licensed appropriately.

What I liked about this park was the quaint beach. There’s swimming here in the warmer months, and the beach is a popular destination, making it a great place to swing your metal detector around. Just remember to get a permit ahead of time like all state parks in New York State.

Source: https://parks.ny.gov/parks/taconicruddpond/details.aspx

Metal Detecting Tip: If you find one coin, chances are you’re going to find more. Not to say you’ve got yourself a honey hole or anything, but it isn’t uncommon to find a cache. People can lose a coin purse just as easily as they lose a single coin. And if you’re lucky, you’ll be the one to find it, so if you find one coin, don’t give up and re-check the area for more! For more great tips on detecting and more, read this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/

6.     Chenango Valley State Park – A Glacier Leftover

A short drive north of Binghamton, just north of the border with Pennsylvania, lies Chenango Valley State Park. I like this park because it has two lakes that were formed when the glaciers retreated. Two massive chunks of ice stuck in the ground turned into the existing lake and marshland at the park today.

With amenities like a sandy beach, camping, and the fact that it’s busy with avid birdwatchers, Chenango is a perfect destination to do some detecting. With such a beautiful landscape, it doesn’t hurt to spend the night in the campground either. If camping isn’t your thing, they also have cabins you can rent.

Source: https://parks.ny.gov/parks/chenangovalley/details.aspx

7.     Allegany State Park

Last stop in New York, and it’s in the beautiful area known as Salamanca. We spent the night camping in the Quaker area of Allegany State Park. There are two lakes, views to kill, a beach to swim (and metal detect), and a playground for the kids.

If camping isn’t something you like, there are also vacation rental cottages and cabins on-site that you can take advantage of and enjoy. With all the activities like fantastic hiking trails and boating (bring your own), it’s one of those state parks you just don’t want to leave.

Source: https://parks.ny.gov/parks/alleganyquaker/details.aspx

Metal Detecting Laws For New York

New York, the big apple, the state where anything is possible with a cup of coffee. And that includes metal detecting but replace the coffee with a permit.

Metal detecting is allowed in both state parks and in parks in the city of New York itself.

Please read and understand the laws – this site isn’t perfect so read what the State of New York has to say here – https://www.nycgovparks.org/permits/metal-detector

However, in both cases, you will need to get a permit. State permits cost $40 and are easy to apply. City park metal detecting permits are also obtainable via completing the appropriate form.

There are various regulations regarding the size of shovel you are allowed to use to dig. See the following table.

Park TypeMaximum Shovel WidthMaximum Shovel Length
New York State Parks1.5”6”
New York City Parks4”12”

Within New York City parks there are a number of other restrictions like you can’t dig within 25’ of a tree drip line, manicured lawns, or landscaped areas. For more information about the particulars of metal detecting within the particular park, speak with city or state park officials as each park may also have its specific regulations. I’ve included the links below that you need to get your permits.

Quick Law Recap:

New York City Parks: Permit required.

New York State Parks: Permit required.

National Forests: Permit required from US Forest Service.

BLM Lands: Permit required.

Metal Detecting Clubs In New York

Metal Detecting Tip: If you’re new to metal detecting, or you just got a new detector, try using it and tuning it in your yard. Try a seeded hunt by burying different coins and objects in your own backyard, noting the items’ locations and depths. Then you can get a feel for how your detector works and get used to how it beeps and responds to the various test objects. Just make sure you don’t bury your wedding ring and then forget where you put it! You might even be surprised to find something you didn’t bury, like an old relic or coin or something from a previous decade. For more great tips, take a look at this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/

Metal Detecting Treasures Found In New York

A woman in New York was recently going over her late father’s possessions and found an envelope with a 1980 class ring in it. The woman’s name is Lois, and her father was an avid hobby hunter, always with a metal detector in hand. And he had a knack for finding things and always tried to return lost items like rings to their rightful owners.

Unfortunately, in the case with the enveloped right, there were no inscriptions to be able to tell who owned the ring. So, despite her late father’s attempts to find its owner, the ring remains in Lois’s care. Read the full story here – https://patch.com/new-jersey/berkeley-nj/beach-metal-detecting-turns-central-regional-class-ring

Metal Detecting Resources In New York

Metal Detector Stores In New York For Expert Advice


Learning How to Use Your Metal Detector Can Be Tough, But I’ve Got You Covered with These Articles


David-Humphries-Metal-Detecting

David Humphries, Writer and Creator of METAL DETECTING TIPS. After borrowing my son’s detector and finding $.25. I felt like a treasure hunter. FREE MONEY! I was seriously bitten by the metal detecting bug.

7 Best Places to Metal Detect in Pennsylvania [Maps, Laws and More]

7 Best Places to Metal Detect in Pennsylvania [Maps, Laws and More]

Knowing how rich and diverse the history is in Pennsylvania, I had to swing through some of the state parks for some detecting. After all, the state is where the Constitution was written and thus deserves a visit. With 13 million people in Keystone State, it’s worth taking the time to see the sites and detect the parks!

There are several great stories about lost or stolen gold in every state, and Pennsylvania is no exception. With its rare beauty and well over 100 state parks, Pennsylvania has a lot to offer, from a seemingly endless supply of parks to a historically rich atmosphere.

Pennsylvania Metal Detecting
Pennsylvania Metal Detecting

During our state adventures, I found 7 of my favorite parks to do some detecting. Let’s have a look at these parks, shall we?


1.     World’s End State Park – A Gem in The Wilderness

Starting our journey in the eastern end of Pennsylvania, we find one of my favorite parks that always reminds me of pirate movies. World’s End State Park is an incredibly scenic park with more than a few great spots to detect. Down by the river, there is a great place where kayaks are often launched. A small and sandy shore area there is widely used and often a spot to find lost treasures.

There’s much more to World’s End than a small canoe and kayak launch, though. Some of the great things you can do at this park are:

  • Environmental education programs
  • Hiking
  • Kayaking (BYO)
  • Camping

Here’s how to find the World’s End State Park – https://goo.gl/maps/SE1G9wz1ms9597QN8

Source: https://www.dcnr.pa.gov/StateParks/FindAPark/WorldsEndStatePark/Pages/default.aspx


I’m always getting asked what equipment I use. I’ve been recommending the same solid metal detecting equipment for years.

  • My first metal detector was the Garrett Ace 250 (link to Amazon for current prices and reviews). This machine is still working great after 6 years. I keep it around for “group” treasure hunts.
  • I’m currently sweeping with a Garrett AT Pro Metal Detector (Link to Amazon for Prices). Since I bought my AT PRO Garrett has come out with a package that includes wireless headphones. Getting tangled up in a wire when your on your knees digging is a pain. Check out the Garrett AT MAX package with Z-Lynk Headphones and Pin Pointer (Link for great prices over at Amazon)
  • When it comes to digging two tools are a must have. 1. A hand trowel -I recommend the Lesche Digging and Cutting Tool (link to check it out) and 2. A sand scoop – the one I’m using is the CKG Sand Scoop with Handle (Link to Amazon for current price and reviews) A good sand scoop is a game changer for beaches.
  • Finally get a good pinpointer. I have an older Garrett Pro, but the newer version – Garrett Pro-Pointer AT with Z-Lynk is completely waterproof to 20 feet and hooks up to your wireless headphones.

2.     Tuscarora State Park – Over 1600 Acres of Fun

Another incredible state park to do some detecting (and maybe some boating and fishing) is Tuscarora. This park is also on the eastern side of Pennsylvania, and with Locust Lake State Park not far, it’s sort of a double feature.

The park is open all year from dawn to dusk and plays host to many a family reunion and other gatherings. Current rules for pandemic bylaws may be in place, so if you want to have a gathering there, you’ll want to check the rules first. But if you’re just going to do some detecting, then just drop a call into their park office to find out what areas you’re good to go into with your detector.

Here are some of the park’s highlights:

  • Hiking
  • Canoeing
  • Boating
  • Fishing
  • Camping

You can find this incredible park here – https://goo.gl/maps/rUATjkYVTCTxsspS9

Source: https://www.dcnr.pa.gov/StateParks/FindAPark/TuscaroraStatePark/Pages/default.aspx


3.     Caledonia State Park – Pet-Friendly Camping

Traveling to the south end of the state, we find another feature-rich park. One of my favorites, Caledonia State Park, offers various amenities and some great places to do some detecting. Here are a few of the park’s amenities and activities:

  • Pet-friendly camping
  • Cabins
  • Trailer sites
  • Fishing
  • Camping
  • Swimming
  • Hiking

You can find Caledonia State Park here – https://goo.gl/maps/9VtSUvZHoGQHjpYt8

Source: https://www.dcnr.pa.gov/StateParks/FindAPark/CaledoniaStatePark/Pages/default.aspx

4.     Cowans Gap State Park – Pristine Lake Camping

When you’re traveling through the southern side of Pennsylvania, don’t miss taking a night or two at Cowans Gap State Park. It sports a 42-acre lake, some gorgeous rustic cabins, hiking, and more. They even have a concession area you can buy snacks and hot foods. Here are some of the park’s amenities:

  • Hiking
  • Camping
  • Cabins
  • Fishing
  • Swimming
  • Boating
  • EV charging station

You can find Cowans Gap State Park here – https://goo.gl/maps/EL1rXgBBmTZ7QAv96

Source: https://www.dcnr.pa.gov/StateParks/FindAPark/CowansGapStatePark/Pages/default.aspx


5.     Moraine State Park – Cabin Life and Boating

Going to spend a night or two at Moraine State Park is reminiscent of having a cottage. The fact that there are quaint little cottages to rent in this park is fantastic. No camping allowed, only cabins. There are also two beaches and plenty of boating opportunities.

With fishing, hiking, hunting, wildlife watching, and more to do at Moraine, it’s a great park to take the whole family. Everyone will find something fun to do (so you can sneak off and do some detecting).

Source: https://www.dcnr.pa.gov/StateParks/FindAPark/MoraineStatePark/Pages/Hunting.aspx

Metal Detecting Tip: Don’t let a trip or two with no treasures get you down. Sometimes you’re only going to find what seems like garbage. But keep the faith and don’t falter because one day you will find something of value, and you’ll see how it’s all been worth it. Remember, if treasure were so easy to find, everyone would find it, so don’t give up! For more great tips on detecting and more, read this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/

6.     Presque Isle State Park – Sand Out to Sea

When you’re up in the northern corner of Pennsylvania, right along the shores of Lake Erie, you’ll find Presque Isle State Park. This sandy 3,200-acre peninsula arches into the lake and offers some spectacular sandy beaches.

With many activities like swimming, boating, fishing, hiking, and biking, there’s never a dull moment for you and your family at Presque Isle. There are often a decent amount of people on hot days, so if you want to do some prospecting, best to do so on cooler days. You’re also less likely to get any flack from the park staff if it isn’t busy. Just make sure to check in with them first, like in any state park in Pennsylvania.

Source: https://www.dcnr.pa.gov/StateParks/FindAPark/PresqueIsleStatePark/Pages/default.aspx

Metal Detecting at Playground
Metal Detecting at Playground

7.     Lyman Run State Park – Beach and Picturesque Views

Near Galeton, Pennsylvania, you’ll find a great park called Lyman Run State Park. It offers hiking, ATV riding, boating, fishing, swimming, and more. Rest assured, there’s always something fun and exciting to do at Lyman Run, and the gorgeous forested hills are a perfect backdrop to this magical place.

Grab your detector and take a stroll down the beach or along any of the numerous trails in the area. Just check in with the park first to see if there are any sensitive areas you’re not allowed, but it’s pretty straightforward to get detecting there as long as you check in with the staff first.

Source: https://www.dcnr.pa.gov/StateParks/FindAPark/LymanRunStatePark/Pages/default.aspx


Metal Detecting Laws for Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania is an excellent state for metal detecting because the laws are open and transparent. Metal detecting is allowed in Pennsylvania, but there are a few conditions.

Metal detecting is allowed in most state parks, but it’s limited to certain areas. For example, metal detecting is not allowed in areas where it may conflict with park operations. It is also not allowed in any fenced-in swimming areas.

There are specific dates and times metal detecting is allowed. The metal detecting ‘season’ is from Tuesday after Labor Day until the Saturday before Memorial Day for beach areas. It’s up to each park manager during the summer whether they will let you on the beach with a detector or not. Similarly, in all state parks, metal detecting is only permitted between sunrise and sunset. No nighttime metal detecting is allowed.

The rules are also quite particular about the use of tools. Now, you might think a small spade would be okay, but it is not permitted. The only digging tools allowed are narrow-pronged like a weeder tool or an ice pick. They recommend using a screwdriver as an appropriate digging tool on the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation & Natural Resources website.

If you find anything while metal detecting in a state park, you have to show what you found to the park manager before leaving the park. Many parks have historical artifacts, and so the park rules stipulate you have to show the park manager what you want to remove from the park before you remove it.

Whenever you want to go metal detecting in a state park in Pennsylvania, check with the park first to ensure you have permission. There are no fees, and often it’s as simple as a quick phone call and saying hello when you arrive on site.

Quick Law Recap:

Pennsylvania State Parks: Allowed under conditions noted above. See the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation & Natural Resources for more information.

National Forests: Permit required from US Forest Service.

BLM Lands: Permit required.


Metal Detecting Clubs in Pennsylvania

  • Beaver County Detecting Club – New Brighton, PA – It was founded in 2007 and had dozens of members. You can see their website here. – http://www.beavercountydetectingclub.com/
  • Black Diamond Treasure Hunters Club – Forty Fort, PA – https://bdthc.org/
  • Lancaster Research & Recovery Club – Lancaster, PA – Founded over 30 years ago as the Lancaster Treasure Hunter & Coinshooter’s Club, the club has regular meetings and a good membership. – https://lrrc.org/
  • Laurel Highlands Searchers – Greensburg, PA – Meetings are on the first Thursday of every month. Here’s a link to their Facebook page – https://www.facebook.com/groups/538969263507776/
  • Southeastern Pennsylvania Historical Recovery Group – Glen Mills, PA – Formed in 2008, the club meets regularly and does group excursions. – https://sphrg.tripod.com/home.html

Metal Detecting Tip: Some metal detectors have a speaker and can beep without the use of headphones. But it would be best if you used headphones anyway. Sometimes that elusive lost treasure only makes a tiny blip that you can easily miss without headphones. But make sure they are comfortable, and if it’s summer, make sure they let your ears breathe too. For more great tips, take a look at this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/


Metal Detecting Treasures Found in Pennsylvania

Recently a man named Dennis Parada and his son Kem met with the FBI and presented evidence that they had located a buried shipment of gold. But rather than let them move forward, Dennis claims the agents told him, “If the gold’s there, it’s ours.”

Finding a cache of gold treasure is always something that every metal detector wants to find. And when you follow the proper channels to lay claim to your find, sometimes things just don’t work out the way you want. So, always ensure you are doing things the right way, and with any luck, the treasure will be yours to claim!

Read the full story here – https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/treasure-hunters-claim-fbi-stole-civil-war-gold-hoard-ln5w2b6sf


Metal Detecting Resources in Pennsylvania


Metal Detector Stores in Pennsylvania For Expert Advice


Check Out These Spots for your Next Metal Detecting Trip


David Humphries, Writer and Creator of METAL DETECTING TIPS. After borrowing my son’s detector and finding $.25. I felt like a treasure hunter. FREE MONEY! I was seriously bitten by the metal detecting bug.

7 Best Places to Metal Detect in Indiana [Maps, Laws and More]

7 Best Places to Metal Detect in Indiana [Maps, Laws and More]

In our family adventures across the United States, we weren’t far from Indiana come Memorial Day weekend, so I thought it would be fun to swing past Indianapolis for the Indianapolis 500. As this event is known as “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing,” I thought I’d take the family to see it. With so many tourists in town, there would be many a lost item to find with my detector, after all.

Regardless of whether you’re a race fan or not, there are plenty of great things to do in Indiana. The state boasts many great parks and places you can go to find nature and do some prospecting with your trusty metal detector.

The laws in Indiana are a bit stricter than in some of the other states regarding metal detecting. So, stick with me, and we’ll cover those laws after I tell you about my favorite seven state parks to do detecting in Indiana.


1.     Pokagon State Park – 2 Lakes, Beaches, And More

Once called Lake James State Park, this park near Angola in the northeast corner of Indiana is a great little park to stay for a weekend. It boasts a fishing lodge-themed inn which is a popular destination in the Midwest.

Nestled between Lake James and Snow Lake, there are ample opportunities to do some excellent shore detecting or prospecting. Just remember to get your permit from the park rangers. Here are a few of the amenities you’ll find at Pokagon:

  • Swimming
  • Boating
  • Fishing
  • Cross-country skiing
  • Sledding
  • Ice fishing
  • Hiking
  • Paddle, pontoon, and rowboat rentals
  • Camping

Here’s how to find Pokagon State Park: https://goo.gl/maps/yuKRwQU7RMowGH9z5

Source: https://www.in.gov/dnr/parklake/2973.htm


I’m always getting asked what equipment I use. I’ve been recommending the same solid metal detecting equipment for years.

  • My first metal detector was the Garrett Ace 250 (link to Amazon for current prices and reviews). This machine is still working great after 6 years. I keep it around for “group” treasure hunts.
  • I’m currently sweeping with a Garrett AT Pro Metal Detector (Link to Amazon for Prices). Since I bought my AT PRO Garrett has come out with a package that includes wireless headphones. Getting tangled up in a wire when your on your knees digging is a pain. Check out the Garrett AT MAX package with Z-Lynk Headphones and Pin Pointer (Link for great prices over at Amazon)
  • When it comes to digging two tools are a must have. 1. A hand trowel -I recommend the Lesche Digging and Cutting Tool (link to check it out) and 2. A sand scoop – the one I’m using is the CKG Sand Scoop with Handle (Link to Amazon for current price and reviews) A good sand scoop is a game changer for beaches.
  • Finally get a good pinpointer. I have an older Garrett Pro, but the newer version – Garrett Pro-Pointer AT with Z-Lynk is completely waterproof to 20 feet and hooks up to your wireless headphones.

2.     Pike Lake Beach – Family-Friendly Fun

On our adventures, we swung through Warsaw, Indiana, and spent the day at Pike Lake. There’s a campground there and some of the best fishing around. The lake boasts many pike fish, hence the name, which attracts many anglers to the lake.

There’s also swimming at Pike lake, and with such a nice campground and picturesque views of the lake, it’s no wonder this place is busy. And do you know what that means? More lost treasures to find! Just make sure you get your permission before you do any prospecting here.

  • Camping
  • Swimming
  • Fishing
  • Incredible views

Finding Pike Lake Beach and Campground are easy; just take a look: https://goo.gl/maps/8K4MzKSQs6j3okXi8

Source: https://www.kcgov.com/eGov/apps/locations/facilities.egov?view=detail&id=10


I’m always getting asked what equipment I use. I’ve been recommending the same solid metal detecting equipment for years.

  • My first metal detector was the Garrett Ace 250 (link to Amazon for current prices and reviews). This machine is still working great after 6 years. I keep it around for “group” treasure hunts.
  • I’m currently sweeping with a Garrett AT Pro Metal Detector (Link to Amazon for Prices). Since I bought my AT PRO Garrett has come out with a package that includes wireless headphones. Getting tangled up in a wire when your on your knees digging is a pain. Check out the Garrett AT MAX package with Z-Lynk Headphones and Pin Pointer (Link for great prices over at Amazon)
  • When it comes to digging two tools are a must have. 1. A hand trowel -I recommend the Lesche Digging and Cutting Tool (link to check it out) and 2. A sand scoop – the one I’m using is the CKG Sand Scoop with Handle (Link to Amazon for current price and reviews) A good sand scoop is a game changer for beaches.
  • Finally get a good pinpointer. I have an older Garrett Pro, but the newer version – Garrett Pro-Pointer AT with Z-Lynk is completely waterproof to 20 feet and hooks up to your wireless headphones.

3.     Deam Lake State Recreation Beach – Boating and Beauty in One Place

Deam Lake should be called Dream Lake because it’s so beautiful that it’s like being in a dream. You can rent these quaint little cabins to spend the night or camp on the 194-acre property. The views of the lake are incredible, and getting permission to do some hobby prospecting with your detector is no big deal – just swing by the park office first and get permission. You’ll be glad you did (but you might not want to leave this beautiful oasis).

  • Fishing
  • Boating
  • Swimming
  • Camping
  • Hiking
  • Hunting
  • Picnicking

You can locate the Deam Lake State Recreation Beach here: https://goo.gl/maps/X1cWYsdo8F3Zujiz8

Source: https://www.in.gov/dnr/forestry/4825.htm


Having the right tools to dig with makes a HUGE difference when Metal Detecting. Digging items quickly allows you to work more ground. I recommend three tools:

Lesche Digging Tools for Metal Detecting
Lesche Digging Tools for Metal Detecting

4.     Indiana Dunes State Park – Lake Michigan Awaits

Located in Chesterton, Indiana, on the southern shores of Lake Michigan, is a vast expanse of beach and sand to explore at Indiana Dunes State Park. Permission is required to use your metal detector, like all state parks in Indiana, but this one is especially worth the effort.

Here are a few of the amenities you’ll find at Indiana Dunes:

  • Nature Center (the kids love this)
  • Picnicking
  • Hiking
  • Fishing
  • Swimming
  • Birding
  • Camping

You can easily find the Indiana Dunes State Park here: https://goo.gl/maps/dxgV26DidH194mwT7

Source: https://www.in.gov/dnr/parklake/2980.htm


5.     Versailles State Park – Swimming, Boating, And More

If you’re headed to the rolling hills of southeastern Indiana, you need to stop in at Versailles State Park. The park boasts a 230-acre lake where you can swim, boat, fish, and more. There’s even a boat ramp here, so you can launch a powerboat (or detect near the ramp).

Here are a few of the fun activities you can do at Versailles State Park:

  • Boating
  • Fishing
  • Picnicking
  • Hiking
  • Mountain Biking
  • Swimming
  • Rental canoes, kayaks, and rowboats

Source: https://www.in.gov/dnr/parklake/2963.htm


Metal Detecting Tip: Winter weather is no fun, but when it melts, things start to heat up! The best time to go detecting is after the snow melts. Trinkets and treasures lost in the snow are often right in plain view or just under some surface clutter. All you need is your detector and these treasures waiting for you to find them. For more great tips for metal detecting, read this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/


Check Out These Spots for your Next Metal Detecting Trip


6.     Summit Lake State Park – Beautiful Lake and Woodlands

Located near New Castle in mid-Indiana is one of my favorite parks: Summit Lake State Park. The hiking here in the Zeigler Woods is incredible and looks like it has barely been touched by humans (another incredible feat). The park offers rental canoes, paddleboats, and rowboats and even boasts three boat launch ramps. With picnicking, fishing, hiking, swimming, and more to do, the family will have fun all day while you’re combing the beach with your detector. Just make sure you get permission, like in other State parks of Indiana.

  • Picnicking
  • Fishing
  • Hiking
  • Boating (3 launch ramps)
  • Swimming

Source: https://www.in.gov/dnr/parklake/2967.htm


7.     Potato Creek State Park

In north-central Indiana resides Potato Creek, State Park. This beautiful state park boasts a 327-acre lake (Worster Lake), wetlands, and mature woodlands. Its pristine beauty is only matched by the fun times you can have detecting here. Like other Indiana state parks, you’ll need permission, but it’s worth it. Look at all the fun things you can do at Potato Creek:

  • Boating (2 launch ramps)
  • Hiking
  • Biking (3.2 miles of bicycle trails and 6.6 miles of mountain bike trails
  • Fishing
  • Cross-country skiing
  • Canoe, kayak, rowboat, and trolling motor rentals
  • Family-friendly playground

Source: https://www.in.gov/dnr/parklake/2972.htm


Metal Detecting Laws for Indiana

Indiana has some of the best prospecting opportunities around, but you need a permit in most places. For us metal detecting folk, we are very restricted in Indiana. To do any real metal detection, in most places you need a permit. The laws are pretty clear about that fact.

Metal Detecting in Indiana
Metal Detecting in Indiana

Your best bet is to find some state parks where you can get written permission to use your metal detector. Often this falls to beaches within state parks. And unlike other states, you can’t just claim to be doing a hobby. You’re going to need a permit in most cases, but fear not, they aren’t that hard to get. In many cases, the park rangers are well aware that people with metal detectors will come around, and most park offices have the forms that need to be filled out.

Metal Detecting Tip: Steer clear of any national parks. These parks do not permit the use of a metal detector.

It may seem to you that Indiana is all “doom and gloom” when it comes to metal detection. Although it’s true, the state is relatively strict, there is hope, and that’s in finding land controlled by the Bureau of Land Management. According to mdhtalk.org, detection on BLM land is permissible as long as no artifacts are removed. Well, this doesn’t stop you from finding coins and jewelry lost at typical camping sites on BLM land, and you’re not required to have a permit, so it works out fine. (source)


Quick Indiana Law Recap:

Indiana State Parks: Only allowed with a permit and typically only on beaches.

National Forests: Permit required from US Forest Service.

Bureau of Land Management (BLM): Permitted without removal of artifacts.


Metal Detecting Clubs in Indiana

  • Fort Wayne – Miami Valley Coin and Relic Hunters Club – This club has a Facebook page that has been inactive since December, 2018. You can attempt to connect with them here: https://www.facebook.com/mvcrhc
  • Hartford City – East Central Indiana Research & Recovery – Another club with little to no activity (the last update on the website was 2017). You can attempt to reach this club here: http://ecith.weebly.com/

Metal Detecting Tip: Who doesn’t love fun in the sun and sand? Well, if you want a great experience with your detection, then go to the beach! Beaches are great because most of the time, using a hobby metal detector is no issue in most places. The sand is quickly turned over and easy to leave no trace. Best of all, people lose jewelry, coins, and other valuables at the beach all the time. Once lost, it’s up to you and your detector to find them! For more great tips, read this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/


Metal Detecting Treasures Found In Indiana

There’s nothing like a heartfelt story to make you smile. And metal detecting in Indiana can give us a story all right. Recently an Evansville, Indiana veteran of metal detecting Tony Montgomery (30 years or more detecting) found something in town, and it was gold!

The once lost item was the gold-plated fireman’s badge of a man named “C.Ayers,” as per the engraving on the badge. After contacting some local news agencies, Tony finally found the descendant of C.Ayers, who was ecstatic to have a memento from his late father’s career as a fireman.

You can read all about the story here: https://www.14news.com/2021/01/26/evansville-man-finds-retired-fire-department-badge-with-metal-detector/


Metal Detecting Resources in Indiana


Metal Detector Stores In Indiana For Expert Advice


David Humphries, Writer and Creator of METAL DETECTING TIPS. After borrowing my son’s detector and finding $.25. I felt like a treasure hunter. FREE MONEY! I was seriously bitten by the metal detecting bug.