7 Best Places to Metal Detect in Connecticut [Maps, Laws and More]

7 Best Places to Metal Detect in Connecticut [Maps, Laws and More]

New England has such a rich history; I really wanted to take my family through the six New England states, so swinging through Connecticut was a given. Connecticut is one of the original 13 colonies and home of Samuel Colt, the revolver’s inventor. With so many things in Connecticut’s history, I wondered how the metal detecting scene was there.

We started our journey through New York through Connecticut, but I’m going to take you on a journey through my favorite State Parks there. We stayed at most parks, which I’ll point out the amenities available for each for your adventures while metal detecting.

Places to Metal Detect in Connecticut
Places to Metal Detect in Connecticut

Concerning permission to do the detecting in the state, we’ll get to that as well. Let’s start with a summary of each of my favorite State Parks worth doing some treasure hunting within.


1.      Black Rock State Park

In the scenic rolling hills of the Western Highlands, you’ll find Black Rock State Park. We drove there and took up a tent on one of the 78 camping sites they have available. It was one of those periods of sleep you remember well. I don’t know if it was the tranquil solitude or the incredibly fresh and crisp air, but I remember I enjoyed it.

While at the park, you can do some hiking and other activities I’ll mention in a moment. You can even do some fishing in the park if you’re so inclined, but I opted to do some treasure hunting as my means of entertainment. Just ensure you call ahead for permission and guidance as to where it’s allowed on site.

Some of the great things you can do at this park are:

  • Camping
  • Picnicking
  • Hiking
  • Pond Fishing
  • Stream Fishing
  • Swimming

Here’s how to find the Black Rock State Park – https://goo.gl/maps/hxnCTGzdoB7ZJ8vE9

Source: https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/State-Parks/Parks/Black-Rock-State-Park


I’m always getting asked what equipment I use. I’ve been recommending the same solid metal detecting equipment for years.

  • My first metal detector was the Garrett Ace 250 (link to Amazon for current prices and reviews). This machine is still working great after 6 years. I keep it around for “group” treasure hunts.
  • I’m currently sweeping with a Garrett AT Pro Metal Detector (Link to Amazon for Prices). Since I bought my AT PRO Garrett has come out with a package that includes wireless headphones. Getting tangled up in a wire when your on your knees digging is a pain. Check out the Garrett AT MAX package with Z-Lynk Headphones and Pin Pointer (Link for great prices over at Amazon)
  • When it comes to digging two tools are a must have. 1. A hand trowel -I recommend the Lesche Digging and Cutting Tool (link to check it out) and 2. A sand scoop – the one I’m using is the CKG Sand Scoop with Handle (Link to Amazon for current price and reviews) A good sand scoop is a game changer for beaches.
  • Finally get a good pinpointer. I have an older Garrett Pro, but the newer version – Garrett Pro-Pointer AT with Z-Lynk is completely waterproof to 20 feet and hooks up to your wireless headphones.

2.      Hopeville Pond State Park – History And Great Fishing Fun

Hopeville has a history rich in local culture. From the significant fishing ground for the Mohegan Indians on the Pachaug River to the first settlement installation of a sawmill and corn mill back in 1711, the area has seen some interesting centuries. Naturally, when presented with an opportunity to do a bit of metal detecting, I was eager to oblige.

Here are some of Hopeville Pond State Park’s highlights:

  • Camping
  • Hiking
  • Boating
  • Bicycling
  • Fishing
  • Swimming

You can find this incredible park here – https://goo.gl/maps/pJJYmg6wWPCCiXFa8

Source: https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/State-Parks/Parks/Hopeville-Pond-State-Park


3.      Hammonasset Beach State Park – Over 2 Miles Of Beach To Treasure Hunt

Hammonasset is Connecticut’s largest shoreline park. That’s why it has to come in the top three of my favorite state parks in Connecticut to do some metal detecting. I found a few caches of coins on my adventures at Hammonasset, and they have so much you can do there that you can even make a weekend of it, so definitely check out this park.

Finding Money Metal Detecting on a Beach
Finding Money Metal Detecting on a Beach

Here are a few of the park’s amenities and activities:

  • Bicycling
  • Camping
  • Picnicking
  • Fishing
  • Swimming
  • Boating (personal watercraft only, no boat launch)
  • Nature center

You can find Hammonasset Beach State Park here – https://goo.gl/maps/ysyicxYYjQat9VRk6

Source: https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/State-Parks/Parks/Hammonasset-Beach-State-Park


4.      Rocky Neck State Park – Crabbing And Salt Marshes

One of the most fascinating state parks on my journey was at the Rocky Neck State Park. Not only can you stop in for a bit of crabbing, but they’ve got camping, a beautiful white sand beach, and more. It’s a real adventure too if you enjoy nature hiking. They have scenic trails with a lookout area overlooking a salt marsh which I found pretty fascinating. But not as glamorous as the cash of coins I found on the white sand beach.

Here are some of the park’s activities:

  • Camping
  • Crabbing
  • Hiking
  • Fishing
  • Swimming

You can find Rocky Neck State Park here – https://goo.gl/maps/yXqRrWkpEgDVgZpEA

Source: https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/State-Parks/Parks/Rocky-Neck-State-Park


5.      Mashamoquet Brook State Park – Wolf Den And Rich History

Mashamoquet is one of those hidden gems that should be more popular, but I’m glad it isn’t. We stopped in for a night, took advantage of the camping and swimming, and had a great time hearing about the local area’s legends and lore.

The park features a nice swimming area and beach, camping, fishing, and picnicking. It was quaint and not overly busy, so I enjoyed it. Just don’t forget to contact them in advance for permission to dig on the beach metal detecting. They are good people there, so it shouldn’t be much issue if you ask first.

Source: https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/State-Parks/Parks/Mashamoquet-Brook-State-Park

Metal Detecting Tip: Always be respectful and follow the law. Remember that trespassing is just a simple lack of respect. In the wrong place, that could get you in some hot water. Or, if you pull out the metal detector without checking local regulations, you could wind up paying the price. Always respect your surroundings and local laws when out treasure hunting. After all, a respectful treasure hunter is welcome to come back! For more great tips on detecting and more, read this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/


6.      Lake Waramaug State Park – One Of The Most Picturesque Parks In The State

Lake Waramaug State Park is an extremely beautiful place to visit. That’s why I was so happy to find out they offer camping in the park. That meant that I could take my time on the beach with my detector and let the kids play and fish without worrying about leaving.

The best days to do your metal detecting at this park are those that are overcast, raining, or cool. The beach is small, so you may not be permitted to metal detect if it’s busy. So, pick the dreary days and call ahead to confirm.

Source:  https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/State-Parks/Parks/Lake-Waramaug-State-Park/Getting-Here


7.      Seldon Neck State Park – An Island In The Connecticut River To Explore

This lush and wooded island park is a beautiful place to wrap up our adventures. There are four primitive camping areas you can pitch a tent for the night, there’s lots of hiking, stunning views and being an island there is, of course, fishing as well.

Source: https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/State-Parks/Parks/Selden-Neck-State-Park/Activities


Metal Detecting Laws For Connecticut 

Connecticut is both strict and yet not when it comes to metal detecting. You see, they don’t have many mentions of metal detector use in any of the laws. You do not require any form of permit to use a metal detector in most places, and they are allowed in state parks.

Where the law clamps down is regarding digging. Most state parks do not permit disturbance of the earth. So you’ll want to stick to beaches for the most part. And definitely call ahead for permission. I found most beaches/state parks weren’t hard to get permission to do my treasure hunting, and there were no fees or permits. They did share a few rules, though, like fill any hole you make, leave no trace, throw away garbage you find, and also have to submit personal items like watches and jewelry to the state park officials.

Quick Law Recap:


Metal Detecting Clubs In Connecticut 

  • Yankee Territory Coinshooters – Hartford, CT – Founded in 1976, the Yankee Territory Coinshooters has monthly meetings and events based out of Hartford, Connecticut. You can find their website here: http://yankeeterritorycoinshooters.com/
  • Nutmeg Treasure Hunters – North Haven, CT – Founded in 1984, NTH has monthly meetings and various experiences to share. You can find their website here: https://www.nutmegtreasurehunters.com/
  • Nor’Easters Metal Detecting Club – Stamford, CT – This club meets every 3rd Thursday but has slowed down meetings due to recent events. You can find their website here: https://www.noreasters.net/

Metal Detecting Tip: When it comes to lions, they are always more plentiful where there are gazelles. Similarly, treasures are often more abundant where there is a more significant potential for them to become lost. It includes but is not limited to high traffic areas. For example, let’s say you’re treasure hunting on the beach. You are more likely to find something in an area that experiences more traffic than in lesser populated areas. For more great tips, take a look at this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/


Metal Detecting Treasures Found In Connecticut 

Treasure hunting in Connecticut is nothing new. For some time, clubs have formed, and people like Doug Bowden, a landscaping company owner, have found their way into the hobby. Connecticut, for its size, has some very popular and growing metal detector clubs, some massing nearly 2000 members on their Facebook pages.

Connecticut is known to metal detectorists for being a great place to find historic coins, gold, and otherwise. The state is old and rich in history, so there’s a massive amount of coins lost over time in the state, making rich finds for treasure hunters.

Read the full story here – https://www.norwichbulletin.com/news/20200201/metal-detectorists-search-for-history-riches—and-region-has-plenty-of-both


Metal Detecting Resources In Connecticut 


Learning How to Use Your Metal Detector Can Be Tough, But I’ve Got You Covered with These Articles


Metal Detector Stores In Connecticut For Expert Advice


David Humphries, Writer and Creator of METAL DETECTING TIPS. After borrowing my son’s detector and finding $.25. I felt like a treasure hunter. FREE MONEY! I was seriously bitten by the metal detecting bug.


7 Best Places to Metal Detect in California [Maps, Laws and More]

7 Best Places to Metal Detect in California [Maps, Laws and More]

Traveling across California via a road trip is one of the classic west coast adventures that everyone should do. The I5 is a known road trip highway stretching from Mexico to Washington. While taking my family on this journey, we had to stop at some great state parks along the way, even if they were a bit off the beaten path. After all, California has some of the most impressive state parks in the country.

Places to Metal Detect in California
Places to Metal Detect in California

The only drawback to this great state is that you need to call ahead to the state parks if you want to attempt any metal detecting. Once you’ve jumped over that hurdle, the state parks become great places for any adventure, and metal detecting can be one of them.

Let’s take a look at some of the incredible state parks you can visit in California, and if you get in touch with them in advance for permission, and do some excellent metal detecting in them while you’re there.

We’ll take a look at my seven favorite California State Parks or areas I’ve enjoyed, along with some of their amenities and features.

Then we’ll take a look at more details about the laws, clubs, stores, and more surrounding metal detecting in the beautiful sun-bathed state of California.


1.     Fort Ord Dunes State Park – Swimming And Sun On The Beach

California has some of the most incredible beaches in the world. Six of these beachfront parks are located in a 21 mile stretch of coast of the Monterey Bay Area. These beaches allow activities such as swimming, kayaking, and according to the official brochure – beachcombing.

Metal-Detecting-Tips-for-Beach
Metal-Detecting-Tips-for-Beach

Keeping in mind regulations in the state, it’s best to call ahead for permission. However, if no tools are used to disturb the earth, reasonable disturbance in sand merely by walking on it would dictate that essentially if you leave no trace, there should be no issue. Keeping this in mind, call ahead to confirm you don’t need a permit for using a metal detector on one of the six gorgeous beaches of Fort Ord Dunes State Park.

Some of the great things you can do at this park are:

  • Swimming
  • Beachcombing
  • Snorkeling
  • Kayaking

Here’s how to find the Fort Ord Dunes State Park – https://goo.gl/maps/vweY7j1B5iqP21gx6

Source: https://www.parks.ca.gov/pages/576/files/FortOrdDunesMonterey_Web2014.pdf


If you want to search for GOLD Northern California is the place to go. I’ve got a list of great spots in this article: Where to Metal Detect in Northern California


2.     El Capitan State Beach – Swimming and Sycamores

El Capitan State Park has a wide variety of options to entertain you and your family on your adventures. The beautiful beaches and park are located just west of Santa Barbara off Hwy 101.

I enjoyed my time at this beach because I was allowed to use my metal detector on the beach when I was there. Ensure you call ahead, though, as times change quickly, along with rules.

The beach has some incredible tide pools, so keep your eyes open for unique shells which you’re there. You might just find shells worth more than potentially lost treasures your detector will pick up.

El Capitan has a variety of amenities to keep you and your family entertained. Here are some of the park’s highlights:

  • Camping
  • Boating
  • Swimming
  • Biking
  • Hiking
  • RV Access
  • Fishing
  • Guided Tours Surfing

You can find this incredible park here – https://goo.gl/maps/P5JVrHWU7DmLFwX4A

Source: https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=601#Brochures-content-pannel


I’m always getting asked what equipment I use. I’ve been recommending the same solid metal detecting equipment for years.

  • My first metal detector was the Garrett Ace 250 (link to Amazon for current prices and reviews). This machine is still working great after 6 years. I keep it around for “group” treasure hunts.
  • I’m currently sweeping with a Garrett AT Pro Metal Detector (Link to Amazon for Prices). Since I bought my AT PRO Garrett has come out with a package that includes wireless headphones. Getting tangled up in a wire when your on your knees digging is a pain. Check out the Garrett AT MAX package with Z-Lynk Headphones and Pin Pointer (Link for great prices over at Amazon)
  • When it comes to digging two tools are a must have. 1. A hand trowel -I recommend the Lesche Digging and Cutting Tool (link to check it out) and 2. A sand scoop – the one I’m using is the CKG Sand Scoop with Handle (Link to Amazon for current price and reviews) A good sand scoop is a game changer for beaches.
  • Finally get a good pinpointer. I have an older Garrett Pro, but the newer version – Garrett Pro-Pointer AT with Z-Lynk is completely waterproof to 20 feet and hooks up to your wireless headphones.

3.     Folsom Lake State Recreation Area – Camping, Swimming, And More

Not too far east of Sacramento, nestled in the Sierra-Nevada foothills lies Folsom Lake State Recreation Area. This beautiful area has all kinds of fun things you and your family can do while taking the time to enjoy your journey in the state of California.

The state-run recreation area allows many different activities, from swimming to fishing and boating to camping and hiking. There’s even more, to do there though, here are a few of the park’s amenities and activities:

  • Biking
  • Windsurfing/Surfing
  • Horseback riding
  • Historical/Cultural site

Give them a call before you go to find out where you’re allowed to use your metal detector, but the state’s primary rules apply regarding disturbing the environment, so leave no trace.

You can find the Folsom Lake State Recreation Area here – https://goo.gl/maps/d4rYiREt8HPh87h18

Source: https://www.parks.ca.gov/pages/500/files/FolsomLakeFinalWebLayout061016.pdf


4.     Emma Wood State Beach – Sand, Sun, And Dolphins

Besides a fascinating historic war site you can explore, Emma Wood State Beach is another fabulous Californian beach with camping on site. You can even see Dolphins jumping just off-shore sometimes, which I thought was pretty exciting while I strolled along the coast.

One of the great things about this state beach park is the versatility of camping allowed. They have family camping, RV access, even primitive camping, which I haven’t tried yet, but it sounds interesting.

Here are some of the park’s further activities:

  • Bike Trails
  • Swimming
  • Surfing
  • Camping
  • RV Access

You can find Emma Wood State Beach here – https://goo.gl/maps/z5bvqURTsnneMACy6

Source: https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=604


5.     San Onofre State Beach

Just three miles south of San Clemente on the I-5 is a great place to get some sun. One of California’s vital watersheds, this state beach is not only crucial for the environment, but it also boasts some of Cali’s legendary surf breaks as well.

When you’re traveling through San Clemente, don’t miss out on San Onofre. There are many things to do, including pitching a tent to do some camping or reserving a spot for your RV.

You can do a variety of activities when not strolling on the beach in search of lost treasures. The park also offers the ability to go swimming, biking, hiking, scuba diving, snorkeling, and of course, surfing.

Source: https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=647


Metal Detecting Tip: A fantastic way to ensure you don’t miss anything on your treasure hunt is to walk in a grid-like pattern. Map out the area in your mind and cover it methodically, like a forensic detective might map out a crime scene, or how an archaeological dig might be mapped into a grid. Using this technique ensures you don’t miss out on that elusive treasure waiting to be found. For more great tips on detecting and more, read this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/


6.     Auburn State Recreation Area – Gold Panning Allowed

Less than 50 miles outside of Sacramento, you’ll find the Auburn State Recreation Area. This jewel in the heart of the gold country is a great place to take the family for fun and adventure. The park boasts several connected campgrounds, features like kayaking, horseback riding, and mountain biking all permissible, the fun can last the entire day.

Auburn State Recreation Area also allows gold panning for recreational purposes. No tools other than a pan are permitted, but it’s one step closer to being able to do full treasure hunting at the park. Make sure you call the park in advance to find out where you’re allowed to use a metal detector in the park.

Source: https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=502


7.     Livermore Area Parks – Non-State Park Permit Aquireable

If you can manage to visit Livermore, California, get in touch with the Livermore Area Recreation and Park District office and obtain a metal detecting permit. The parks office has jurisdiction over several places that can allow you to do some excellent treasure hunting for a license that doesn’t cost too much.

Source: https://www.larpd.org/

Metal detecting on beach for treasures
Metal detecting on beach for treasures

Metal Detecting Laws For California

California is a very liberal state, but that doesn’t mean that they allow metal detecting as freely as other states. Many parks, including state parks, do not allow metal detecting. Or at least, they do not allow aspects of typical treasure hunting, namely digging. Many parks have strict policies that maintain that although waving a metal detector around might not be against the rules, digging a hole to find what your metal detector detected might be crossing the line. At the very least, typically, a permit of sorts is required. Always call ahead to any park you want to do metal detecting to ensure you are compliant with local regulations.

Quick Law Recap:

  • California State Parks: Disturbance of natural scenery, plants, and animal life is strictly forbidden. Aside from that, there is zero mention of metal detectors within the state website rules and regulations resource. However, it is against the law to pry or dig up any mineralogical, historical, or archaeological item within the state without appropriate permission. Find more about metal detecting in California Park System HERE.
  • National Forests: Permit required from US Forest Service – I also advise reading this PDF regarding Lake Tahoe National Forest. https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprd3851963.pdf
  • BLM Lands: Permit required. Read this article about Metal Detecting – Can Metal Detect on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Land? I also recommend checking at the BLM Website – HERE

California State (General):  Within California’s penal code states that any person who finds a lost item must do their due diligence to find the owner and return the item; otherwise, it is considered theft.


Metal Detecting Clubs In California

  • East Bay Prospectors – Concord, California. This club is an official chapter of the GPAA, founded in 2009. The club has a relatively new website and forum with very little current activity. Contact them directly for more information. Here’s their website link: https://ebprospectors.com/
  • Mount Diablo Metal Detecting Club – Concord, California. This club boasts club meetings held on the 2nd Tuesday of each month. The club has events such as mini-hunts and larger planned trips. Membership fees apply. Here’s their website link: http://mdmdc.com/

Metal Detecting Tip: Use a sweeping pattern. When you’re detecting in an area, try sweeping your detector from side to side, each pass slightly overlapping the previous pass. This way, you will have less chance of missing those elusive treasures. For more great tips, take a look at this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/


Metal Detecting Treasures Found In California

A good treasure hunter never turns down the possibility of a gold nugget. In California, a gold nugget weighing 70 ounces was found by such a treasure hunter. Using a metal detector in the foothills of Butte County, the hunter would later sell the nugget for a whopping $400,000. Not a bad payday for that guy! Read the full story here – https://www.coinworld.com/news/precious-metals/gold-butte-nugget-california-digger-bob-coin-world-precious-metals-kagins-numismatics.html


Metal Detecting Resources In California


Metal Detector Stores In California For Expert Advice


Check Out These Spots for your Next Metal Detecting Trip


David Humphries, Writer and Creator of METAL DETECTING TIPS. After borrowing my son’s detector and finding $.25. I felt like a treasure hunter. FREE MONEY! I was seriously bitten by the metal detecting bug.


7 Best Places to Metal Detect in Florida [Maps, Laws and More]

7 Best Places to Metal Detect in Florida [Maps, Laws and More]

Florida, stretching 447 miles from north to south and its natural highest point only 345 feet above sea level, it’s reasonable to assume Florida maintains many beach and coastal areas. Indeed it does, and the beaches are incredible for our treasure hunting adventures. Mention Disney, and you’ll never have a problem convincing the kids to go too, that’s for sure.

Where to Metal Detect in Florida
Where to Metal Detect in Florida

We began our journey in the northwest of the state, having traversed Alabama just before. We went to many different places in Florida, but it was the beaches that really stood out. Treasure hunting can be pretty exciting, and beaches are busy places, so they tend to lose a lot of valuables there. It’s perfect for any treasure hunter, as long as you don’t mind the heat.

Our first stop, Big Lagoon State Park!


1.      Big Lagoon State Park – Beaches, Kayaking, And Adventure!

I dare say that any beach has it all, but Big Lagoon is pretty hard to argue with. We decided that because the park is a natural stopover for over 23 species of wood-warbler and countless other species, that it would be worth becoming a stop on our journey through the state, our first stop, that is.

Big Lagoon State Park is located in Pensacola, Florida, and has various things to do, from birdwatching to kayaking and more. Here’s a list of the most popular activities and amenities the park has to offer:

  • Swimming
  • Kayaking
  • Boating
  • Fishing
  • Camping
  • Paddling
  • Bicycling
  • Geocaching

Here’s how you can find the incredible sand beaches of Big Lagoon State Park: https://goo.gl/maps/VS5YcU894KJkDvsj6

Source:  https://www.floridastateparks.org/parks-and-trails/big-lagoon-state-park


I’m always getting asked what equipment I use. I’ve been recommending the same solid metal detecting equipment for years.

  • My first metal detector was the Garrett Ace 250 (link to Amazon for current prices and reviews). This machine is still working great after 6 years. I keep it around for “group” treasure hunts.
  • I’m currently sweeping with a Garrett AT Pro Metal Detector (Link to Amazon for Prices). Since I bought my AT PRO Garrett has come out with a package that includes wireless headphones. Getting tangled up in a wire when your on your knees digging is a pain. Check out the Garrett AT MAX package with Z-Lynk Headphones and Pin Pointer (Link for great prices over at Amazon)
  • When it comes to digging two tools are a must have. 1. A hand trowel -I recommend the Lesche Digging and Cutting Tool (link to check it out) and 2. A sand scoop – the one I’m using is the CKG Sand Scoop with Handle (Link to Amazon for current price and reviews) A good sand scoop is a game changer for beaches.
  • Finally get a good pinpointer. I have an older Garrett Pro, but the newer version – Garrett Pro-Pointer AT with Z-Lynk is completely waterproof to 20 feet and hooks up to your wireless headphones.

2.      Henderson Beach State Park – People, Sun, And Treasures!

Henderson Beach State Park is located in Destin, Florida, and was rated on US News as the #1 beach destination. Henderson has such massive popularity; the sand was sure to be filled with lost trinkets, jewelry, and coins! I just had to bring my family there and see for myself.

There’s a lot to do in the park, despite what one might think. Some of the great things you can do at this park are:

  • Camping
  • Bicycling
  • Fishing
  • Swimming
  • Hiking
  • Geocaching
  • Birdwatching

Here’s how to find the beaches of Henderson Beach State Park – https://goo.gl/maps/5PouFMHQTq7McPyH6

Source: https://www.floridastateparks.org/index.php/parks-and-trails/henderson-beach-state-park


Metal Detecting Tip: Learn about equipment, metal detector technology has exploded in the last 10 years. BUT technique and learning to read the tones are essential to being successful. You’ve got to check out this article (link) that gives 41 Metal Detecting Tips

3.      Grayton Beach State Park – White Sandy Beaches And Hot Sun!

Coastal forests and scrub hiking trails, and pristine beaches drew us to Grayton Beach, located at Santa Rosa Beach, Florida. Like many other state parks, and luckily for us, as the day was winding down when we arrived, the park has camping sites you can rent for a place to spend your night. It works great if you’re doing a tour like I was. Just ensure you call ahead to book your site; these sites are often filled.

Metal Detecting at Playground
Metal Detecting at Playground

Here are a few of the park’s other amenities and activities for you and your family to enjoy:

  • Camping
  • Bicycling
  • Fishing
  • Swimming
  • Hiking
  • Geocaching
  • Birdwatching
  • Paddling
  • Boating

You can find Grayton Beach State Park here – https://goo.gl/maps/FubABRgqmWE8bQKs8

Source: https://www.floridastateparks.org/graytonbeach


4.      Long Key State Park – Snorkeling And Treasure!

We decided our journey needed to put a few miles on, so we drove down to the Long Key State Park. Located way down the sliver that makes Florida’s southern tip, you need to take the Overseas Highway, which was quite an experience unto itself.

Here are some of the park’s activities:

  • Camping
  • Swimming
  • Snorkeling
  • Hiking
  • Fishing

You can find the Long Key State Park here – https://goo.gl/maps/dWwPEdBV7iztH6229

Source: https://www.floridastateparks.org/index.php/parks-and-trails/long-key-state-park

Check out this article that’s all about Metal Detecting Underwater <-Link


5.      Sebastian Inlet State Park – A Surfer’s Paradise!

Known amongst surfers worldwide for riding “First Peak” and “Monster Hole,” this surfer’s paradise has a lot more going for it than just some world-renowned surfing locales. You can take your family here as I did, go fishing, swim in the ocean or just walk the beach (with a metal detector in hand, of course).

There are lots to see at Sebastian Inlet, including collecting shells, checking out sea turtle nests, or doing some kayaking. The point is that your family will all have something fun to do here while at night you can camp in a tent or drive in your RV as I did.

Source: https://www.floridastateparks.org/parks-and-trails/sebastian-inlet-state-park


Metal Detecting Tip: Carry at least two sets of batteries for your detector. There’s nothing worse than finding some significant detecting areas and running out of power. That’s why I like to keep one set of good batteries in my detector and two spare sets. If you get on a roll, you won’t need to stop and drive off to find a store for batteries. For more great tips on detecting and more, read this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/


6.      CURRY HAMMOCK STATE PARK – Raw Nature Half Way To Key West!

Deep into the keys is Curry Hammock State Park. Another must-see location that you can spend the night (camping). As any typical beach or waterfront park has for activities, fishing, canoeing, kayaking, snorkeling, swimming, and all the other usual activities you’d expect to find are permitted.

When we went to Curry Hammock, the thing that stood out to me was that it was surprisingly secluded. For an area under development, I anticipated some pretty big crowds. In truth, it was quite a peaceful visit, and the beaches are perfect for detectorists.

Source: https://www.floridastateparks.org/parks-and-trails/curry-hammock-state-park


7.      GAMBLE ROGERS MEMORIAL STATE RECREATION AREA AT FLAGLER BEACH

Gamble Rogers Memorial is a small 145-acre park in Palm Beach, Florida. The park features some great birdwatching and has camping with RV access, which was a nice touch. We spent the night at Gamble Rogers and I spent several hours with the old and faithful detector roaming the beach in search of treasure. Ensure you ask for permission before whipping out your metal detector, some areas may not be entirely permitted.

Garrett AT MAX in Water
Garrett AT MAX in Water

Some of the other activities permitted at Gamble Rogers Memorial State Park include Bicycling, Boating, Fishing, Swimming, Hiking, Paddling, and Geocaching. Pets are allowed too, so if you’ve got a dog you’re still okay.

Source: https://www.floridastateparks.org/parks-and-trails/gamble-rogers-memorial-state-recreation-area-flagler-beach


Metal Detecting Laws For Florida

According to MDHtalk.org, some locations in Florida require a permit for metal detecting. These counties include Orange County and Ocala, Florida. National Parks and recreation areas are strictly off-limits for treasure hunters. There is hope for the state, though, and that comes with the Florida State Parks. In particular, I like the beaches, but the point is that most parks allow metal detectors, as long as you check in with them for permission first.

Almost no places, in terms of state parks, require any kind of fees. However, some parks have specific requirements as to which areas are permissible or not for metal detectorists. The issue isn’t using the metal detectors; typically, it has more to do with disturbing an area via digging.

Quick Law Recap:

National Parks in Florida: Not permitted.

National Forests: Permit required from US Forest Service

BLM Lands: Permit required for relics, non-relic no permit required. Read about what the BLM says about metal detecting HERE.

Florida State Parks: Permitted in certain areas. Always ask permission first. Below are three articles talking about metal detecting in the State of Florida


Metal Detecting Clubs In Florida

  • South Florida Treasure Hunter’s Club – Hollywood, FL – Meetings are held monthly according to their website – https://soflatreasurehunters.tripod.com/
  • Ocala Metal Detecting Club – Ocala, Florida – Typically holds monthly meetings – http://www.ocalametaldetectingclub.com/
  • Coinshooters and Historical Club – Daytona Beach, FL – Founded in 1984, this club meets monthly according to their website. – http://www.digandfind.com/index.html
  • Panhandle Research & Recovery Metal Detecting Club – Panama City, FL – Meets monthly on Saturdays and was established in 1996 according to their website. – https://panhandleresearchrecoverymetaldetecting.weebly.com/index.html
  • Suncoast Research & Recovery Club – Pinellas Park, FL – Monthly meeting dates posted on their website appear to be up to date, ergo an active club. This club prides itself on recovering lost rings and such for people. There are several tales of recovery on their website. – http://www.srarc.com/
  • Central Florida Metal Detecting Club – DeBary, FL – Founded in 1972, this club boasts over 200 members and has meetings on the 2nd Friday of the month. – http://www.thecfmdc.com/
  • Treasure Coast Archeological Society – Sebastian, FL – The club appears to be active but has recently canceled its annual hunt due to the pandemic. You can read about it on their website. – http://www.tcas.us/
  • Western State Archaeological Society – Tampa, FL – Holding monthly meetings, this club has been around since November of 1976. You can read about them on their website here. – https://www.wsas.club/
  • Gold Coast Treasure Club – West Palm Beach, Florida – Founded in 1973, this club has regular meetings and recovery service. See their website for more information. – https://www.apex-ephemera.com/gctc/

Metal Detecting Tip: If it’s one thing Florida has a lot of, it’s beaches. Take advantage of this fact in the state. When in any other states, if you’re hard-pressed to find a good location, try the beach! The great thing about beaches is that coins and items are easily lost in the sand and easily dug up by you! Just make sure the particular park or property allows it first, of course. For more great tips, take a look at this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/


Metal Detecting Treasures Found In Florida

A couple that was married for 17 years were reunited with their lost wedding band in Florida when a group of metal detectorists put themselves on the case. The touching story aired on ABC Action News back in December of 2020. Watch the full story here -https://youtu.be/1YC2hmtrux4


Metal Detecting Resources In Florida


Metal Detector Stores In Florida For Expert Advice


Check Out These Spots for your Next Metal Detecting Trip


David Humphries, Writer and Creator of METAL DETECTING TIPS. After borrowing my son’s detector and finding $.25. I felt like a treasure hunter. FREE MONEY! I was seriously bitten by the metal detecting bug.


7 Best Places to Metal Detect in Washington State [Maps, Laws and More]

7 Best Places to Metal Detect in Washington State [Maps, Laws and More]

The beautiful west coast. It’ss a place of fresh air, new beginnings, rugged mountains, and some of the best metal detecting in North America. Why do I say this? Because when I took my family to Washington state to see Mount Rainier – an active volcano in the mountains, I was surprised at how organized their metal detecting culture was.

The state of Washington makes life easy for metal detectorists. Sure, we still have to fill out a form, but unlike some states, Washington has an accessible online portal that makes it simple to register. You can register your detecting for many state parks, which gives you a wide variety compared to other stricter states.

With the ease of registration and so many state parks allowing metal detecting in designated areas, it can still be challenging to determine where to go. So, I’ve lined up my favorite seven state parks in Washington state where you can have a great time metal detecting and even bring the family. Let’s dive in.

1.     Beacon Rock State Park – Amazing Adventures And Lots To Do And See

Our journey begins in the heart of the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area of Washington. One thing that is impressive about this park is that Beacon Rock, towering above the local foliage, is the heart of an ancient volcano!

The park boasts over 9,500 feet of freshwater shoreline and holds over 4,400 acres of year-round park beauty. There are many things to do and enjoy at Beacon Rock, and one of the main reasons I like the park is the diversity of areas that you are allowed to detect. Look at the resource section further in this article and check out the state parks’ maps that show the areas where metal detecting is permitted (the map shows 13 large allowable areas where we can detect our heart’s content).

Some of the great things you can do at this park are:

  • Camping
  • Boating
  • Biking
  • Hiking
  • Equestrian Trails
  • Fishing
  • Rock Climbing

Here’s how to find the Beacon Rock State Park – https://goo.gl/maps/Exqu4XhzmJaERooe6

Map of metal detecting permissible areas – https://parks.state.wa.us/DocumentCenter/View/8437/Beacon-Rock-State-Park-Metal-Detecting-PDF

Source: https://parks.state.wa.us/474/Beacon-Rock


2.     Kanaskat-Palmer State Park – White Water Rafting And Detecting Adventures

Two miles of shoreline on the Green River and the Kanaskat-Palmer State Park might appear to be like any other state park where a river traverses its boundary. But, this park has a lot more to offer than meets the eye. Some of the best kayaking can be found at the K.P., as I like to call it. Although with no actual boat launch to speak of, the park does offer some of the most exciting whitewater rafting around if you don’t mind launching by hand. That being said, kayaks are an excellent option for a side-adventure when you tire of detecting the 19-acre permissible detection area and trails.

Here are some of the park’s highlights:

  • White Water Rafting
  • Kayaking
  • Camping

You can find this incredible park here – https://goo.gl/maps/9Pv99c3qRQZf7wybA

Map of metal detecting permissible areas – https://parks.state.wa.us/DocumentCenter/View/8162/Kanaskat-Palmer-State-Park-Metal-Detecting-PDF

Source: https://parks.state.wa.us/527/Kanaskat-Palmer


3.     Lake Sylvia State Park – Gorgeous And Quant

First arriving at Lake Sylvia State Park, I was taken aback by the beauty of this gem of a park nestled in the forest just north of the town of Montesano, Washington. The park boasts only 6 acres of permissible metal detection areas, but the beauty makes it completely worth it.

Metal Detecting at Lake Sylvia State Park WA
Metal Detecting at Lake Sylvia State Park WA

The small lake only allows non-motorized watercraft, so there’s no danger of loud and obnoxious boat engines buzzing around, polluting the pristine waters of Lake Sylvia. The area offers a variety of nature-based activities as well, from bird watching to fishing.

Here are a few of the park’s amenities and activities:

  • Hiking
  • Mountain biking
  • Camping
  • Fishing
  • Boating (non-motorized)

You can find Lake Sylvia State Park here – https://goo.gl/maps/VxfPHq1fYksJQoWcA

Map of metal detecting permissible areas – https://parks.state.wa.us/DocumentCenter/View/9786/Lake-Sylvia-State-Park-Metal-Detecting-PDF

Source: https://parks.state.wa.us/534/Lake-Sylvia


4.     Rockport State Park – Green Forest West Coast Beauty

Do you like the forest? If you do, then Rockport State Park is a dream come true! There are some of the most beautiful hiking trails with ferns that you’re only going to see growing the way the west coast offers. Boasting over 14 acres of permissible metal detecting trails, this is one of those extreme inner peace kinds of parks. You can lose yourself in the beauty of the trails, stop for a picnic and admire the trees, some of which are over 250 feet tall!

Here are some of the park’s activities:

  • Hiking (day use only)
  • Bird watching

You can find the Rockport State Park here – https://goo.gl/maps/UDg2LLvAwYsa4eAs8

Map of metal detecting permissible areas – https://parks.state.wa.us/DocumentCenter/View/8348/Rockport–State-Park-Metal-Detecting-PDF

Source: https://parks.state.wa.us/574/Rockport


This website is all about the how, where and gear used in metal detecting. Below are some great articles to teach a bit more about “treasure hunting” with a metal detector.


5.     Ocean City State Park – Clamming And Detecting In One Place

The first time we traveled to Ocean City State Park, I was surprised to find out we could do a little clamming. It’s a great spot to dig up razor clams for a great tasty treat in season. I mean, who doesn’t like doing a little clamming in between detection tours, right? With the four large detection zones in the park, you’re likely to get hungry, after all.

This park boasts camping, fishing, bird watching, hiking, and even has a picnic area. You can stop with a decent-sized group for a big outing together if you like. It has over 145 camping sites and also 29 RV hookup sites, so everyone is bound to find a way to spend the night and enjoy their time in Ocean City State Park.

Map of metal detecting permissible areas – https://parks.state.wa.us/DocumentCenter/View/9796/Ocean-City-State-Park-Metal-Detecting-PDF

Source: https://parks.state.wa.us/554/Ocean-City


Metal Detecting Tip: Have you ever had a stretch where you didn’t get so much as a beep and realized your tuning was off? I once spent half a day hunting before realizing the long stretch of silence was a mistuned detector. So, how do we prevent this pickle? By carrying a test coin, that’s how. Or, as some on the forums like to call it – a tuning coin. Bring one in your gear so you can test and tune your detector on the fly to ensure top results. For more great tips on detecting and more, read this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/


6.     Kitsap Memorial State Park – Beauty And Romance In A Park

Were you looking to spark a little romance in your life? Well, I can tell you we enjoyed the peaceful rental cabins nestled in this beautiful park. There are many great activities to do here as well, with over 1,700 feet of saltwater shoreline and over 20 acres of metal detection permissible area. Again allowing for things like fishing, crabbing, clamming, oystering, hiking, swimming, and more, you really can’t go wrong with Kitsap Memorial State Park.

Map of metal detecting permissible areas – https://parks.state.wa.us/DocumentCenter/View/9784/Kitsap-Memorial-State-Park-Metal-Detecting-PDF

Source: https://parks.state.wa.us/529/Kitsap-Memorial


Warning: If your metal detector isn’t completely waterproof you might not want to scan beaches. When a metal detector manufacturers WATERPROOFS a unit it has been designed to keep SAND, SALT WATER and MOISTURE out. Don’t ruin your machine get a waterproof unit – I highly recommend the: Garrett AT MAX link to Kellyco

Garrett AT MAX photo credit Kellyco

The last stop on our adventures brings us right to the coast at Westport Light State Park. The park boasts an area of over 50 acres for metal detecting along the gorgeous shoreline. The metal detection zone even stretches right out of the park and into the Seashore Conservation Area, so as long as you’re permits allow, you could detect until your heart is content.

Map of metal detecting permissible areas – https://parks.state.wa.us/DocumentCenter/View/8352/Westport-Light-State-Park-Metal-Detecting-PDF

Source: https://www.parks.state.wa.us/284/Westport-Light


Metal Detecting Laws For Washington State

Washington State is one of those states that fall into the mid-zone for laws regarding metal detecting. For example, most cities don’t allow metal detecting in their parks, except for cities like Seattle that do allow it. However, Seattle law states that the shovel must be handheld with a blade no wider than 2”. So, if you’re staying in Seattle, have at the parks with your detector and small hand spade!

Like other states, National Forests and BLM land is illegal to detect metal without a special prospecting permit, so it may not be worth the effort, but that’s up to you.

Washington State Parks is a progressive state park service that allows metal detecting in multiple parks. You have to register first, but that’s easy via their online portal. Just make sure you check in with staff at the park after registering and find out which areas of the park you are allowed to detect metal.

Quick Law Recap:

  • State Parks: Permit required, allowed in multiple parks in designated areas.
  • National Forests: Permit required from US Forest Service
  • BLM Lands: Permit required. – Go over to the BLM website to learn more about using a metal detector on BLM land. Link – Bureau of Land Management

Metal Detecting Clubs In Washington State


Metal Detecting Tip: Have you ever tried hard not to disturb things with a big hole, but a tree root is right in your path? Try using a hand shovel that has a built-in serrated blade along one side. These handy tools work great at cutting through pesky tree roots blocking your path to a potential great find. For more great tips, take a look at this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/


Metal Detecting Treasures Found In Washington State

In June of 2020, a man and some friends were metal detecting on a beach in Washington when a man found something he’d never seen before. Buried just six inches in the sand was a brass button with a phoenix on it and some French writing. It turns out it was a brass military button from the 1800s. An English company made the button for the king of Haiti and his military. It just goes to show that you never know what you are going to find. Read the full story here – https://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2020/06/25/Man-finds-Haitian-Phoenix-Button-from-1800s-on-Washington-state-beach/7521593114417/


Metal Detecting Resources In Washington State


Metal Detector Stores In Washington State For Expert Advice


I’m always getting asked what equipment I use. I’ve been recommending the same solid metal detecting equipment for years.

  • My first metal detector was the Garrett Ace 250 (link to Amazon for current prices and reviews). This machine is still working great after 6 years. I keep it around for “group” treasure hunts.
  • I’m currently sweeping with a Garrett AT Pro Metal Detector (Link to Amazon for Prices). Since I bought my AT PRO Garrett has come out with a package that includes wireless headphones. Getting tangled up in a wire when your on your knees digging is a pain. Check out the Garrett AT MAX package with Z-Lynk Headphones and Pin Pointer (Link for great prices over at Amazon)
  • When it comes to digging two tools are a must have. 1. A hand trowel -I recommend the Lesche Digging and Cutting Tool (link to check it out) and 2. A sand scoop – the one I’m using is the CKG Sand Scoop with Handle (Link to Amazon for current price and reviews) A good sand scoop is a game changer for beaches.
  • Finally get a good pinpointer. I have an older Garrett Pro, but the newer version – Garrett Pro-Pointer AT with Z-Lynk is completely waterproof to 20 feet and hooks up to your wireless headphones.

David Humphries, Writer and Creator of METAL DETECTING TIPS. After borrowing my son’s detector and finding $.25. I felt like a treasure hunter. FREE MONEY! I was seriously bitten by the metal detecting bug.


7 Best Places to Metal Detect in Wyoming [Maps, Laws and More]

7 Best Places to Metal Detect in Wyoming [Maps, Laws and More]

There are two things I love about Wyoming – The mountains and the feel of the wild west. Those are the two reasons I wanted to take my family there. With towns like Jackson Wyoming, with their wild west wooden building flair, who wouldn’t want to go for a visit? Oh, and we can’t forget Yellowstone either.

We bundled our things into the camper and set off for wild west adventure. I had my handy metal detector all tuned and ready to go, but I recall that Wyoming’s rules aren’t as friendly as some other states. I suppose that’s the rough nature of the wild west. So I decided to make a few calls to some of my favorite state parks we would visit along the way and see if I could arrange to get my permissions to detect.

Treasure Hunting with a Metal Detector in Wyoming
Treasure Hunting with a Metal Detector in Wyoming

When the family and I made the trek to Wyoming, we chose seven of their state parks to visit and sometimes even spend the night. These parks all require permission to metal detect, but I’ll get more into the laws later. Let’s dive into my favorite seven state parks in Wyoming to do some metal detecting.

1.     Glendo State Park – Wyoming’s Best Kept Secret

Glendo State Park, with its more than 22,000-acre size, is one of Wyoming’s best-kept secrets. It’s got everything from fishing and boating to camping and hiking. It’s Wyoming’s all-around best state park, in my opinion, and a great place to take the family.

As I mentioned, this park has it all. Here are just a few of the things you can do at this park:

  • Swimming
  • Hiking
  • Biking
  • Boating
  • Camping

And here are a few of the amenities you’ll find there:

  • Six boating ramps
  • 45 miles of multi-use trails (non-motorized)
  • Swimming beach
  • Campsites for tenting & RVs
  • Restrooms, playgrounds, and more!

Here’s how to find the Glendo State Park – https://goo.gl/maps/NJ9Cvrz4PkPatsaB7

Source: https://wyoparks.wyo.gov/index.php/places-to-go/glendo


I’m always getting asked what equipment I use. I’ve been recommending the same solid metal detecting equipment for years.

  • My first metal detector was the Garrett Ace 250 (link to Amazon for current prices and reviews). This machine is still working great after 6 years. I keep it around for “group” treasure hunts.
  • I’m currently sweeping with a Garrett AT Pro Metal Detector (Link to Amazon for Prices). Since I bought my AT PRO Garrett has come out with a package that includes wireless headphones. Getting tangled up in a wire when your on your knees digging is a pain. Check out the Garrett AT MAX package with Z-Lynk Headphones and Pin Pointer (Link for great prices over at Amazon)
  • When it comes to digging two tools are a must have. 1. A hand trowel -I recommend the Lesche Digging and Cutting Tool (link to check it out) and 2. A sand scoop – the one I’m using is the CKG Sand Scoop with Handle (Link to Amazon for current price and reviews) A good sand scoop is a game changer for beaches.
  • Finally get a good pinpointer. I have an older Garrett Pro, but the newer version – Garrett Pro-Pointer AT with Z-Lynk is completely waterproof to 20 feet and hooks up to your wireless headphones.

2.     Buffalo Bill State Park – Camping, Fishing, And Fun

The Buffalo Bill State Park was named after the man himself, Colonel “Buffalo” William Cody. A part of the park’s land was even once owned by Bill, making it a living piece of the wild west, preserved in the state park.

There are lots to do at Buffalo Bill State Park, including fishing, camping, hiking, boating, and more. Let’s take a look and see some of the park’s highlights:

  • Camping sites for tents & RVs
  • Boat ramp
  • ORVs (Off-Road Vehicles) allowed
  • Fishing
  • Playground
  • Volleyball court

You can find this wild west park here – https://goo.gl/maps/TUJSR2xWGfwJJzcNA

Source: https://wyoparks.wyo.gov/index.php/places-to-go/buffalo-bill


3.     Sinks Canyon State Park – Mystery Disappearing Creeks and Adventure

If you like a little more adventure than your average campsite, Sinks Canyon State Park is an excellent getaway in Wyoming. The park is geared towards the adventurous side of things, so getting permission to metal detect isn’t typically a big deal. That’s only the formalities, though, because, at Sinks Canyon, adventure awaits!

Here are a few of the park’s activities and amenities:

  • Cabins
  • Camping sites for tents & RVs
  • Rock Climbing
  • Mountain Biking

You can find Sinks Canyon State Park here – https://goo.gl/maps/UCWs2SxJLAL4sDRs9

Source: https://wyoparks.wyo.gov/index.php/places-to-go/sinks-canyon


Metal Detecting on BLM
Metal Detecting on BLM

4.     Seminoe State Park

Seminoe State Park offers some tremendous all-around park experiences. With its large reservoir and sand dunes, the park has some spectacular opportunities to do some metal detecting along the beach. When you’re done for the day, you can pack it in at the campground with spots for tent or RV camping.

Here are some of the park’s activities:

  • Beach & swimming
  • Hiking
  • Biking
  • Off-road vehicles (ORV) allowed
  • Camping sites for tents & RVs
  • Boat ramps
  • Fishing pier

You can find Seminoe State Park here – https://goo.gl/maps/LWUYBCqP9zhCnsGM6

Source: https://wyoparks.wyo.gov/index.php/places-to-go/seminoe


5.     Boysen State Park – An Oasis in The Desert

If you’re a fan of fishing or any kind of watersport, then Boysen State Park is the park for you. Sporting a vast reservoir, you can come here and use the ramp to launch your boat to do some waterskiing, or go fishing, or even just float about the water for the day. If you’re like me, then you’ll be prospecting around the park while the family plays in the water.

The park has a playground, volleyball courts, camping for tents or RVs, a beach, and a few other amenities like hiking to please you and your family.

Source: https://wyoparks.wyo.gov/index.php/places-to-go/boysen


Metal Detecting Tip: Carry a sifter with you for the beach. You can even use a strainer. The concept is to have something that can quickly and effectively sift sand so you can scoop the sand into the sifter and quickly find lost rings and coins. Sifters aren’t expensive, and they can save you a bunch of time. For more great tips on detecting and more, read this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/


6.     Hot Springs State Park – Hot Springs and Bison

There is something very peaceful about a majestic herd of bison grazing in the distance. It offers a sense of true wilderness like there was somewhere left in the world, untainted by humankind. If peace and relaxation are your things, then the Hot Springs State Park is a must-visit destination in Wyoming.

Some of the amenities you might expect at Hot Springs State Park are hot springs. They do have a unique all-natural mineral water pool where you can soak your troubles away. With 8 miles and counting of prime hiking around the Earth’s natural heated water wonders, a sense of peace and awe at nature is practically guaranteed.

The family will love the park having things like fishing, hiking, swimming, a playground, and even hotels to stay at for the night. Still, there. Keep in mind the park is a day-use park, so you’ll need to either stay at a hotel or find somewhere else to bed for the night. But with hot springs and beautiful scenery, how could anyone not want to stop by for the day?

Source: https://wyoparks.wyo.gov/index.php/places-to-go/hot-springs



If you’d like more articles about metal detecting check out the links below.

7.     Keyhole State Park

The last of the state park greats of Wyoming is one of the best – Keyhole State Park. This park offers some fantastic features that your family is going to love. With a beach that’s well-used to camping areas, there are plenty of places you could find treasures with your detector. And the staff here are amicable, so getting permission to detect shouldn’t be too much of a hassle.

The Keyhole State Park has many amenities. These include a beach, camping sites for tenting or RVing, a boat ramp, showers, and even an equestrian facility. Worth stopping at this park for a night or three with so much to do here!

Source: https://wyoparks.wyo.gov/index.php/places-to-go/keyhole


Metal Detecting Laws for Wyoming

Wyoming has a rich history and a beauty that is hard to match. And the laws for metal detecting are as strict as the land is wild. Well, that might be a stretch, but it sounded good at the time. Wyoming has three basics you need to be aware of to keep your metal detecting on the legal side of things.

  1. Archeological or historic sites are not allowed.
  2. National forests and BLM land require special permits (not always easy to get).
  3. State parks and recreational areas require the written permission of the park superintendent.

As you may have gleaned from the above three things, we need to know about Wyoming metal detecting law, the state parks are the most accessible place to go metal detecting legally. The park superintendents usually have a simple form you complete, and they give you written permission. Most don’t charge for it, but times change, so anticipate a minimal administration fee.

Quick Law Recap:

Wyoming State Parks: Written permission from the superintendent is required.

Archaeological or Historic Sites: Metal detecting is not permitted.

National Forests: Permit required from US Forest Service.

BLM Lands: Permit required.


Metal Detecting Clubs In Wyoming

As far as I could tell, it seems there is a need for a metal detecting club in Wyoming. There appear to be various forum threads about where Wyoming metal detectorists seek partners in adventure. Still, there doesn’t appear to be an organization in the state boasting the title of a metal detector club of sorts. There are, however, a few gold prospecting clubs, similar and may still be of interest to you:

Metal Detecting Tip: Have you ever used a pinpointer? Do yourself a favor and pick one up. They are smaller, hand-held units that work great to help you pinpoint a location during your dig. I grabbed one a few years back, and I love it. I just carry it in my pack, and when I’m digging, I can use it in one hand with my shovel in the other. That lessens my impact on the area and keeps the park rangers happy. Minimal impact is the way to go. For more great tips, take a look at this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/


Metal Detecting Treasures Found In Wyoming

Although there aren’t any recent massive treasure stories found in Wyoming, it’s a great place to look. Yes, you’ll need to go through a bit of effort in securing your permissions but think of it this way – that effort may just pay off in gold! Many a prospector has searched for gold in the creeks and streams of Wyoming. It’s one of those states that the glaciers once left a lot of deposits behind.

Although it may be unlikely you’re going to find a sizeable gold cache, you might just find a small vein of dust or even a tiny nugget if you’re in the right place. And having your metal detector will make finding that sort of thing a lot easier.


Metal Detecting Resources In Wyoming


Metal Detector Stores In Wyoming For Expert Advice

David Humphries, Writer and Creator of METAL DETECTING TIPS. After borrowing my son’s detector and finding $.25. I felt like a treasure hunter. FREE MONEY! I was seriously bitten by the metal detecting bug.