New England has such a rich history; I really wanted to take my family through the six New England states, so swinging through Connecticut was a given. Connecticut is one of the original 13 colonies and home of Samuel Colt, the revolver’s inventor. With so many things in Connecticut’s history, I wondered how the metal detecting scene was there.

We started our journey through New York through Connecticut, but I’m going to take you on a journey through my favorite State Parks there. We stayed at most parks, which I’ll point out the amenities available for each for your adventures while metal detecting.

Places to Metal Detect in Connecticut
Places to Metal Detect in Connecticut

Concerning permission to do the detecting in the state, we’ll get to that as well. Let’s start with a summary of each of my favorite State Parks worth doing some treasure hunting within.


1.      Black Rock State Park

In the scenic rolling hills of the Western Highlands, you’ll find Black Rock State Park. We drove there and took up a tent on one of the 78 camping sites they have available. It was one of those periods of sleep you remember well. I don’t know if it was the tranquil solitude or the incredibly fresh and crisp air, but I remember I enjoyed it.

While at the park, you can do some hiking and other activities I’ll mention in a moment. You can even do some fishing in the park if you’re so inclined, but I opted to do some treasure hunting as my means of entertainment. Just ensure you call ahead for permission and guidance as to where it’s allowed on site.

Some of the great things you can do at this park are:

  • Camping
  • Picnicking
  • Hiking
  • Pond Fishing
  • Stream Fishing
  • Swimming

Here’s how to find the Black Rock State Park – https://goo.gl/maps/hxnCTGzdoB7ZJ8vE9

Source: https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/State-Parks/Parks/Black-Rock-State-Park

2.      Hopeville Pond State Park – History And Great Fishing Fun

Hopeville has a history rich in local culture. From the significant fishing ground for the Mohegan Indians on the Pachaug River to the first settlement installation of a sawmill and corn mill back in 1711, the area has seen some interesting centuries. Naturally, when presented with an opportunity to do a bit of metal detecting, I was eager to oblige.

Here are some of Hopeville Pond State Park’s highlights:

  • Camping
  • Hiking
  • Boating
  • Bicycling
  • Fishing
  • Swimming

You can find this incredible park here – https://goo.gl/maps/pJJYmg6wWPCCiXFa8

Source: https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/State-Parks/Parks/Hopeville-Pond-State-Park


3.      Hammonasset Beach State Park – Over 2 Miles Of Beach To Treasure Hunt

Hammonasset is Connecticut’s largest shoreline park. That’s why it has to come in the top three of my favorite state parks in Connecticut to do some metal detecting. I found a few caches of coins on my adventures at Hammonasset, and they have so much you can do there that you can even make a weekend of it, so definitely check out this park.

Finding Money Metal Detecting on a Beach
Finding Money Metal Detecting on a Beach

Here are a few of the park’s amenities and activities:

  • Bicycling
  • Camping
  • Picnicking
  • Fishing
  • Swimming
  • Boating (personal watercraft only, no boat launch)
  • Nature center

You can find Hammonasset Beach State Park here – https://goo.gl/maps/ysyicxYYjQat9VRk6

Source: https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/State-Parks/Parks/Hammonasset-Beach-State-Park


4.      Rocky Neck State Park – Crabbing And Salt Marshes

One of the most fascinating state parks on my journey was at the Rocky Neck State Park. Not only can you stop in for a bit of crabbing, but they’ve got camping, a beautiful white sand beach, and more. It’s a real adventure too if you enjoy nature hiking. They have scenic trails with a lookout area overlooking a salt marsh which I found pretty fascinating. But not as glamorous as the cash of coins I found on the white sand beach.

Here are some of the park’s activities:

  • Camping
  • Crabbing
  • Hiking
  • Fishing
  • Swimming

You can find Rocky Neck State Park here – https://goo.gl/maps/yXqRrWkpEgDVgZpEA

Source: https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/State-Parks/Parks/Rocky-Neck-State-Park


5.      Mashamoquet Brook State Park – Wolf Den And Rich History

Mashamoquet is one of those hidden gems that should be more popular, but I’m glad it isn’t. We stopped in for a night, took advantage of the camping and swimming, and had a great time hearing about the local area’s legends and lore.

The park features a nice swimming area and beach, camping, fishing, and picnicking. It was quaint and not overly busy, so I enjoyed it. Just don’t forget to contact them in advance for permission to dig on the beach metal detecting. They are good people there, so it shouldn’t be much issue if you ask first.

Source: https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/State-Parks/Parks/Mashamoquet-Brook-State-Park

Metal Detecting Tip: Always be respectful and follow the law. Remember that trespassing is just a simple lack of respect. In the wrong place, that could get you in some hot water. Or, if you pull out the metal detector without checking local regulations, you could wind up paying the price. Always respect your surroundings and local laws when out treasure hunting. After all, a respectful treasure hunter is welcome to come back! For more great tips on detecting and more, read this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/


6.      Lake Waramaug State Park – One Of The Most Picturesque Parks In The State

Lake Waramaug State Park is an extremely beautiful place to visit. That’s why I was so happy to find out they offer camping in the park. That meant that I could take my time on the beach with my detector and let the kids play and fish without worrying about leaving.

The best days to do your metal detecting at this park are those that are overcast, raining, or cool. The beach is small, so you may not be permitted to metal detect if it’s busy. So, pick the dreary days and call ahead to confirm.

Source:  https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/State-Parks/Parks/Lake-Waramaug-State-Park/Getting-Here


7.      Seldon Neck State Park – An Island In The Connecticut River To Explore

This lush and wooded island park is a beautiful place to wrap up our adventures. There are four primitive camping areas you can pitch a tent for the night, there’s lots of hiking, stunning views and being an island there is, of course, fishing as well.

Source: https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/State-Parks/Parks/Selden-Neck-State-Park/Activities


Metal Detecting Laws For Connecticut 

Connecticut is both strict and yet not when it comes to metal detecting. You see, they don’t have many mentions of metal detector use in any of the laws. You do not require any form of permit to use a metal detector in most places, and they are allowed in state parks.

Where the law clamps down is regarding digging. Most state parks do not permit disturbance of the earth. So you’ll want to stick to beaches for the most part. And definitely call ahead for permission. I found most beaches/state parks weren’t hard to get permission to do my treasure hunting, and there were no fees or permits. They did share a few rules, though, like fill any hole you make, leave no trace, throw away garbage you find, and also have to submit personal items like watches and jewelry to the state park officials.

Quick Law Recap:


Metal Detecting Clubs In Connecticut 

  • Yankee Territory Coinshooters – Hartford, CT – Founded in 1976, the Yankee Territory Coinshooters has monthly meetings and events based out of Hartford, Connecticut. You can find their website here: http://yankeeterritorycoinshooters.com/
  • Nutmeg Treasure Hunters – North Haven, CT – Founded in 1984, NTH has monthly meetings and various experiences to share. You can find their website here: https://www.nutmegtreasurehunters.com/
  • Nor’Easters Metal Detecting Club – Stamford, CT – This club meets every 3rd Thursday but has slowed down meetings due to recent events. You can find their website here: https://www.noreasters.net/

Metal Detecting Tip: When it comes to lions, they are always more plentiful where there are gazelles. Similarly, treasures are often more abundant where there is a more significant potential for them to become lost. It includes but is not limited to high traffic areas. For example, let’s say you’re treasure hunting on the beach. You are more likely to find something in an area that experiences more traffic than in lesser populated areas. For more great tips, take a look at this article: https://metaldetectingtips.com/metal-detecting-tips/


Metal Detecting Treasures Found In Connecticut 

Treasure hunting in Connecticut is nothing new. For some time, clubs have formed, and people like Doug Bowden, a landscaping company owner, have found their way into the hobby. Connecticut, for its size, has some very popular and growing metal detector clubs, some massing nearly 2000 members on their Facebook pages.

Connecticut is known to metal detectorists for being a great place to find historic coins, gold, and otherwise. The state is old and rich in history, so there’s a massive amount of coins lost over time in the state, making rich finds for treasure hunters.

Read the full story here – https://www.norwichbulletin.com/news/20200201/metal-detectorists-search-for-history-riches—and-region-has-plenty-of-both


Metal Detecting Resources In Connecticut 


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Metal Detector Stores In Connecticut For Expert Advice


David Humphries, Writer and Creator of METAL DETECTING TIPS. After borrowing my son’s detector and finding $.25. I felt like a treasure hunter. FREE MONEY! I was seriously bitten by the metal detecting bug.